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MAN AND HIS CULTURE IS SUBJECT OF STUDY

HAS RECEIVED 2200 SPECIMENS THIS YEAR

NO WRITER ATTRIBUTED

World-wide study of the development of man and his culture is being carried in by Harvard anthropologists, both in the field and in the laboratory. Its extent was described yesterday by Donald Scott '00, Director of the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology.

Since its founding in 1866, the Museum has sent more than 430 expeditions to all parts of the world. This year field expeditions have been sent to Ireland, the Tibeto-Indian border, Arizona, and Utah. In addition preparations are under way for work in Greece.

Newburyport Population Survey

Besides the studies connected with this field work, researches in Cambridge included archaeological studies on Persia, northern Mesopotamia, the neolithic period in the Near East, Central Europe, the Valley of Mexico, Honduras, and Panama.

Ethnological studies relating to the survey of the population were made of Newburyport, Massachusetts; Northern Australia; and the Cameroons in Africa. Studies in physical anthropology included the United States, Europe, Arabia, and Siam.

Invaluable Records Collected

Two years have been spent by the expedition on the Tibeto-Indian border, in Assam and in Burma, and another year or more will be required to complete these studies in Cambridge. From a 2000 mile front of ethnic groups, 6400 records have been brought back which have proved invaluable in formulating conclusions of the nature of the area.

During the year, the Museum received 119 accessions, including about 2000 ethnological and archaeological specimens other than flint implements and potsherds, and 676 photographs and charts.

The sources of these accessions were: North America, 34; Middle America, 22; South America, 9; Africa, 17; Europe, 13; Asia, 24; and Oceania, 13.

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