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THE CONFIDENTIAL GUIDE

NO WRITER ATTRIBUTED

When the curtain rings up this evening on a gathering of concentrators in Anthropology, assembled to discuss the high and low spots of their field, the series of meetings that will furnish the basis for the "Crimson" Confidential Guide to Fields of Concentration will begin. Because of the value to incoming Freshmen of an expression of undergraduate opinion with regard to the studies which the University offers, the purpose of the Confidential Guide and the methods by which it is to be prepared should be clear in the minds of all who contribute time and effort in compiling it.

Briefly, the purpose of the Guide is to furnish to Freshmen such "off the record" information about planning their course of study which cannot be got from an official catalogue. This does not simply mean hanging out a flag over casy course, or announcing which are the most inspiring instructors and tutors, but also it means collecting a wide range of miscellaneous information to case the ncophytes over the burcaucratic hurdles which University Hall sets up.

In the course of compiling this material, criticism of courses-both adverse and favorable, constructive and destructive-inevitably arises. Since this criticism records the voice of undergraduate opinion, speaking freely and without duress from above or below, it furnishes a barometer for the faculty to judge their effectiveness in teaching that the College cannot obtain in any other way.

The true value of meetings at which students frankly tear to pieces their various departments and then try to rebuild them again like castles in the air, depends on two things. First, those who testify must be as fair and conscientious in judgment, and as frank and open in offering suggestions, as they possibly know how. Second, the men who write up the reports must interpret the sentiments of the group on the witness stand with accuracy, and must compile the information with clarity and absolute freedom from bias. With such a set-up on the part of both witnesses and recorders, it is to be hoped that the meetings to be held at the Crimson during the next few weeks will bear fruit in a more useful Confidential Guide than ever been issued before.

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