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FACULTY COUNCIL TAKES ACTION ON TUTORING REPORT

Holders of Honorary or Stipendiary Rewards Forbidden to Aid Bureaus Without Written Consent

NO WRITER ATTRIBUTED

In an action that may or may not signalize the opening of a drive on tutoring schools, the Council of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences took yesterday a step in that direction.

According to the announcement from University Hall, the Faculty Council has voted that: "No holder of a scholarship, either stipendiary or honorary, may sell his course or reading notes; nor may he conduct a review for pay or be employed by a tutoring school without the written consent of the instructor in the course involved and the permission of the Scholarship Committee".

This decision is the outcome of the report on tutoring schools made by the Student Council on January 15. A summary of this report is being sent to all teachers in the University by the Faculty board, and a copy of the full report to all Chairmen of Departments and Divisions.

The old ruling, which has become antiquated by changing conditions provided that: "No student, who in any course, without the consent of the instructor, sells lecture notes or holds public reviews (known as 'seminars') immediately before the examinations, may hold any scholarship or fellowship". For many years a copy of this has been sent to all scholarship recipients.

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