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FOOD SUPPLY IS NOT A VITAL WAR ISSUE, EXPERT MAINTAINS IN BUSINESS REVIEW

Holds That England and Germany Are Prepared to Withstand Siege

NO WRITER ATTRIBUTED

Food-supplies will not win this war for either side, declared Dr. Joseph S. Davis 'OS, director of the Stanford University Food Research Institute, in an article which yesterday appeared in the Winter Issue of the Harvard Business Review.

"There is a wide gap between privation and starvation, between food shortage and famine, Davis stated, adding that "major adaptations can be made to slave off mass starvation."

He pointed out the distinction between "undernourishment, or deficiency in calorie intake, and malnutrition, or deficiency in proteins, vitamins, and minerals," remarking that the more vital problem is to maintain the quality of the national diet, especially in regard to vitamin content, in order to "promote vigor, resistance to disease, and a high morale."

Referring to specific countries. Davis maintained that Great, Britain has "forced changes in individual diets, but not radical ones." This has been done "through regulation of imports, controlled distribution of home-grown and individual supplies, and rationing." He supports the contention that the British Isles are facing the Blitzkrieg with ample supplies of food and necessary materials.

Russia, he continued, is in a precarious condition, although the war thus far has had little effect upon the supply of foodstuffs. The territory acquired from Rumania, he stated, "produced a surplus of wheat, corn, and other grains, but both Poland and the Baltie states have had no surpluses of food."

It is on the continent that diets are going to undergo "a drastic modification," Davis contended. "In Germany proper, the food position has not been truly normal for several years. Restrictions are great now, with rationing general; but this is partly to insure maintenance of stocks deemed essential to enable the country to outlast Britain despite the blockade," he said.

Other features in the Winter Issue of the Review include two methods on methods of reorganization of the financial set-up of the U. S. in order to staff effective operation of the defense program.

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