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First Replies to CRIMSON Poll Show Two to 1 Against Letting Communists Teach

NO WRITER ATTRIBUTED

Early returns on a CRIMSON poll indicate that the Faculty believes Communists should not be allowed to teach at colleges. The first 182 answers to the same questionnaire distributed to students last Friday show a two to one vote against permitting such teachers to hold positions in any branch of the faculty.

The question asked was: "Assuming he is otherwise qualified do you think a Communist should be permitted to teach at colleges 1) in the sciences, 2) in the social sciences, and 3) in the humanities?"

The specific breakdown of answers is as follows:   Yes  No In the sciences  59  110 In the social sciences  55  117 In the humanities  53  115

This reaction is in direct contrast to the undergraduate vote, which was more than two to one in favor of permitting Communists to teach, except in the social sciences. The latter tally was 724 to 520 in favor.

Several of the "yes" votes qualified their answers by specifying that a Communist must make his ideology known as a condition of his teaching. Others suggested that a Communist be limited to "factual, realistic presentation," or else solely to the advocation of Communism, also on a "factual" basis.

Other affirmative ballots were limited to permitting only acknowledged Party members, while still others asked for outlawing of such persons, at the same time permitting all others to hold jobs. One Faculty member objected to avowed party members on the grounds that "the Communist party does not stand for Communism."

Among the "no" answers submitted, several objected to Communists on the grounds that they were incapable of impartiality. Another stated flatly that "membership in the Communist party and academic freedom are absolutely incompatible."

A few of the returns objected to the word "Communists" as too vague to be meaningful.

This reaction is in direct contrast to the undergraduate vote, which was more than two to one in favor of permitting Communists to teach, except in the social sciences. The latter tally was 724 to 520 in favor.

Several of the "yes" votes qualified their answers by specifying that a Communist must make his ideology known as a condition of his teaching. Others suggested that a Communist be limited to "factual, realistic presentation," or else solely to the advocation of Communism, also on a "factual" basis.

Other affirmative ballots were limited to permitting only acknowledged Party members, while still others asked for outlawing of such persons, at the same time permitting all others to hold jobs. One Faculty member objected to avowed party members on the grounds that "the Communist party does not stand for Communism."

Among the "no" answers submitted, several objected to Communists on the grounds that they were incapable of impartiality. Another stated flatly that "membership in the Communist party and academic freedom are absolutely incompatible."

A few of the returns objected to the word "Communists" as too vague to be meaningful.

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