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BETWEEN THE LINES

By Edward J. Coughlin

At the Hotel Vendome Football Writers Luncheon yesterday, Coach Lloyd Jordan hit out again at the trend toward de-emphasis of college athletics. Jordan, who heads south to a trustees meeting of the Football Coaches Association next weekend, said. "The game of football, and athletics in general, should be emphasized more. I think these critics--and now I see they include senators and judges--should clean up their own business first, although we coaches are always glad to have suggestions."

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"Large-scale football follows the national picture," the Harvard coach continued, "and if these critics can clean up their own fields, the American Football Coaches Association will do just as good a job of taking care of theirs. Athletics is not the tall-end anymore--it's an important part of education."

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Jordan commented that, for this reason, he favored the retaining of spring practice in college football. "Organized practice over a limited period is good for the boys," he insisted.

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The coach also lauded the work of several of Harvard's 1951 first-stringers. Most highly praised was quarterback Gil O'Neil, around whom Jordan said the had built the entire team. He also singled out the work of Buddy Lemay at center and of Paul Crowley, whom he called "one of the best ends in this district." The coach then went on to mention and praise every member of his offensive and defensive lines.

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Fullback Tom Ossman injured his knee in practice last Wednesday and didn't do any running Thursday or Friday. On the train to Yale. Josh Williams, Bob Margarita, and Jordan got together to figure out a play to replace the effectiveness of the fullback fake pitchout. They came up with the wingback reverse wih a fake to the tailback in motion--the play on which John Ederer went 84 yards to score.

* * * * * *

After Saturday's game, Herman Hickman commented on Ederer's pitching on the wingback reverse pass that set up Harvard's first touchdown. "We knew about the play, of course," he said, "but the boy wasn't supposed to be any good. He was supposed to be just another thrower--but he looked like a passer."

* * * * * *

Hickman let himself in for a lot of ribbing in New York last week when he predicted on his television show that Wisconsin would defeat Michigan on Saturday, and went into a few minutes of brilliant comparative analysis to show exactly why. Wisconsin, of course defeated Minnesota 30 to 6, while Michigan was edging Ohio State.

* * * * * *

There were a great many comments on the questionability of Dartmouth's defensive tactics last Saturday after Princeton's Dick Kazmaler was removed from the game with a slight concussion. Princeton Coach Charley Caldwell refused to shake hands with Dartmouth's Tuss McLaughry after the battle. But Middlebury Coach Duke nelson and Globe sportswriter Ernie Roberts, who attended the game, pointed out at the luncheon that several Big Green players had also been badly injured "Caldwell was just upset," said Roberts. "Dartmouth looked no rougher than most good defensive ball clubs I've seen."

* * * * * *

Clarence E. Chief" Boston sat with Jordan at the luncheon. Boston, highly successful in coaching at the University of New Hampshire, was freshman coach at Harvard before World War II and jayvee coach after the war until 1947.

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