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Hussein Wins Jordan Struggle, Pro-West Khalidi New Premier; House Votes Post Office Funds

By The ASSOCIATED Press

AMMAN, Jordan, April 15--Young King Hussein, backed by tough Bedouin fighters of the Arab Legion, won today in his struggle to give Jordan a moderate government purged of Communists and extremists.

Dr. Hussein Fahkri Khalidi, 61-year-old Palestinian refugee who has shown leanings toward the West, was named prime minister in a seven-man Cabinet.

His appointment ended a six-day crisis set off by Hussein's ouster of Prime Minister Suleiman Nabulsi, a moderate Leftist who headed the powerful National Socialist party. Nabulsi is included in the new Cabinet as a concession to the party, which controls 13 seats in the 40-man Parliament. But no other National Socialist is included.

Hussein emerged from the crisis with greater stature than ever. The 21-year-old King was ruling through virtual martial law.

House Approves Post Office Funds

WASHINGTON, April 15--The House approved an extra 41 million dollars for the Post Office Department today in a move to get quick restoration of normal mail services.

The deficiency bill was passed on a voice vote and sent to the Senate, which may act on it tomorrow.

Postmaster General Summerfield has announced he won't start to restore the service cutbacks until President Eisenhower signs the legislation and Summerfield is certain he will have enough money to maintain normal operations through June 30, the end of the fiscal year.

Swedish Officials Indicted

STOCKHOLM, Sweden, April 15--A legal expert of the Swedish Atomic Energy Commission and a former navy draftsman were formally charged today with espionage for "a foreign power," presumably meaning Soviet Russia.

The indictment accused the nuclear lawyer, Robert F. Damstedt, 29, and draftsman Gosta T. Jakabsson, 35, of conspiring to ship out blueprints of Swedish submarines. It made no mention of any transmission of atomic secrets.

"They are people with somewhat extravagant drinking habits who talked a little bit too much about things they intended to do, but may not have done it," a Foreign Office spokesman said. "These men have confessed to the police that they intended to sell these blueprints to the Russians."

A.P. News in Brief

The British government yesterday asserted its right to declare a danger area for H-bomb tests in the mid-Pacific, and said any trespassers will be there at their own risk.

Minister of Supply Aubrey Jones in a brief statement to the House of Commons, stood by Britain's plans to conduct the test. It proceeded a major debate today on the government's plans to streamline conventional defense forces and rely on guided missiles and atomic power as a deterrent to war. The Labor party has proposed a motion of censure against the government and is demanding postponement of the H-tests until efforts can be made to gain agreement for calling them off.

The Senate Judiciary Committee put off action on the civil rights issue again yesterday, but Chairman Eastland (D-Miss.) said it probably would begin considering the legislation April 29. Eastland wouldn't predict when the committee might take a vote, but Sen. Neely (D-W. Va.) offered an estimate that it never would.

After only ten minutes debate, the Senate yesterday passed by voice vote a bill to increase the interest ceiling on government savings bonds to 3 1/4 per cent from 3 per cent

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