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Latin American Grants Offered to Five Juniors

By Jonathan D. Trobe

Five fellowships for study in Latin America this summer will be granted to qualified juniors who can speak the language of the country they will visit and who are planning to do thesis work in this field, the Office of Latin American Studies announced yesterday.

The purpose of the fellowships, which will be offered again next year, is to phasize increased research on Latin America. "We want students to find out themselves instead of merely getting the material second-hand from courses," explained William S. Barnes, assistant Dean of the Law School and director of Office.

Referring to President Pusey's concern that the University's Latin American course offerings are inadequate, Barnes that "a simple proliferation of courses is not the answer."

Everyone has been jumping on the Latin American bandwagon lately and saying that we must do something about Latin America in our universities, but few people have thought long enough about what has to be done," Barnes . "We're particularly interested in analytical courses in the field. our concern now is to train people to present them," he said.

Office inventory of Harvard Faculty members' interest and experience Latin America has shown that the Economics, History, and Government Departments are "notably unprepared" to offer additional courses on Latin America. On the other hand, Barnes said, Anthropology and Biology have a adequate background in the field.

Create Research Fellowships

The University has taken steps to prepare for an expanded Latin American curriculum by appropriating funds from Bliss chair in History for four research fellowships. After three years of study each fellow will teach a course Latin America.

As a result of this step, Barnes expects that in three or four years "we will see students specializing in Latin American Studies at Harvard." At present there are not enough courses offered to allow specialization.

Although the Office has found that potentially good graduate students drift away because Harvard doesn't satisfy their interests," Barnes pointed out that University is unwilling to follow the of Stanford and the University of Florida by offering a degree in Latin American Studies. Harvard firmly believes that Latin American study is valuable only within a specific discipline, said.

David E. Spenser '63, president of the newly-founded Harvard Latin American Association, reported that "there is a growing interest in Latin America among students and a great demand for more courses." Nearly 100 students have responded to questionnaires circulated by the HLAA and have asked in particular for a course in Latin American colonial history.

Referring to President Pusey's concern that the University's Latin American course offerings are inadequate, Barnes that "a simple proliferation of courses is not the answer."

Everyone has been jumping on the Latin American bandwagon lately and saying that we must do something about Latin America in our universities, but few people have thought long enough about what has to be done," Barnes . "We're particularly interested in analytical courses in the field. our concern now is to train people to present them," he said.

Office inventory of Harvard Faculty members' interest and experience Latin America has shown that the Economics, History, and Government Departments are "notably unprepared" to offer additional courses on Latin America. On the other hand, Barnes said, Anthropology and Biology have a adequate background in the field.

Create Research Fellowships

The University has taken steps to prepare for an expanded Latin American curriculum by appropriating funds from Bliss chair in History for four research fellowships. After three years of study each fellow will teach a course Latin America.

As a result of this step, Barnes expects that in three or four years "we will see students specializing in Latin American Studies at Harvard." At present there are not enough courses offered to allow specialization.

Although the Office has found that potentially good graduate students drift away because Harvard doesn't satisfy their interests," Barnes pointed out that University is unwilling to follow the of Stanford and the University of Florida by offering a degree in Latin American Studies. Harvard firmly believes that Latin American study is valuable only within a specific discipline, said.

David E. Spenser '63, president of the newly-founded Harvard Latin American Association, reported that "there is a growing interest in Latin America among students and a great demand for more courses." Nearly 100 students have responded to questionnaires circulated by the HLAA and have asked in particular for a course in Latin American colonial history.

Everyone has been jumping on the Latin American bandwagon lately and saying that we must do something about Latin America in our universities, but few people have thought long enough about what has to be done," Barnes . "We're particularly interested in analytical courses in the field. our concern now is to train people to present them," he said.

Office inventory of Harvard Faculty members' interest and experience Latin America has shown that the Economics, History, and Government Departments are "notably unprepared" to offer additional courses on Latin America. On the other hand, Barnes said, Anthropology and Biology have a adequate background in the field.

Create Research Fellowships

The University has taken steps to prepare for an expanded Latin American curriculum by appropriating funds from Bliss chair in History for four research fellowships. After three years of study each fellow will teach a course Latin America.

As a result of this step, Barnes expects that in three or four years "we will see students specializing in Latin American Studies at Harvard." At present there are not enough courses offered to allow specialization.

Although the Office has found that potentially good graduate students drift away because Harvard doesn't satisfy their interests," Barnes pointed out that University is unwilling to follow the of Stanford and the University of Florida by offering a degree in Latin American Studies. Harvard firmly believes that Latin American study is valuable only within a specific discipline, said.

David E. Spenser '63, president of the newly-founded Harvard Latin American Association, reported that "there is a growing interest in Latin America among students and a great demand for more courses." Nearly 100 students have responded to questionnaires circulated by the HLAA and have asked in particular for a course in Latin American colonial history.

Office inventory of Harvard Faculty members' interest and experience Latin America has shown that the Economics, History, and Government Departments are "notably unprepared" to offer additional courses on Latin America. On the other hand, Barnes said, Anthropology and Biology have a adequate background in the field.

Create Research Fellowships

The University has taken steps to prepare for an expanded Latin American curriculum by appropriating funds from Bliss chair in History for four research fellowships. After three years of study each fellow will teach a course Latin America.

As a result of this step, Barnes expects that in three or four years "we will see students specializing in Latin American Studies at Harvard." At present there are not enough courses offered to allow specialization.

Although the Office has found that potentially good graduate students drift away because Harvard doesn't satisfy their interests," Barnes pointed out that University is unwilling to follow the of Stanford and the University of Florida by offering a degree in Latin American Studies. Harvard firmly believes that Latin American study is valuable only within a specific discipline, said.

David E. Spenser '63, president of the newly-founded Harvard Latin American Association, reported that "there is a growing interest in Latin America among students and a great demand for more courses." Nearly 100 students have responded to questionnaires circulated by the HLAA and have asked in particular for a course in Latin American colonial history.

Create Research Fellowships

The University has taken steps to prepare for an expanded Latin American curriculum by appropriating funds from Bliss chair in History for four research fellowships. After three years of study each fellow will teach a course Latin America.

As a result of this step, Barnes expects that in three or four years "we will see students specializing in Latin American Studies at Harvard." At present there are not enough courses offered to allow specialization.

Although the Office has found that potentially good graduate students drift away because Harvard doesn't satisfy their interests," Barnes pointed out that University is unwilling to follow the of Stanford and the University of Florida by offering a degree in Latin American Studies. Harvard firmly believes that Latin American study is valuable only within a specific discipline, said.

David E. Spenser '63, president of the newly-founded Harvard Latin American Association, reported that "there is a growing interest in Latin America among students and a great demand for more courses." Nearly 100 students have responded to questionnaires circulated by the HLAA and have asked in particular for a course in Latin American colonial history.

As a result of this step, Barnes expects that in three or four years "we will see students specializing in Latin American Studies at Harvard." At present there are not enough courses offered to allow specialization.

Although the Office has found that potentially good graduate students drift away because Harvard doesn't satisfy their interests," Barnes pointed out that University is unwilling to follow the of Stanford and the University of Florida by offering a degree in Latin American Studies. Harvard firmly believes that Latin American study is valuable only within a specific discipline, said.

David E. Spenser '63, president of the newly-founded Harvard Latin American Association, reported that "there is a growing interest in Latin America among students and a great demand for more courses." Nearly 100 students have responded to questionnaires circulated by the HLAA and have asked in particular for a course in Latin American colonial history.

David E. Spenser '63, president of the newly-founded Harvard Latin American Association, reported that "there is a growing interest in Latin America among students and a great demand for more courses." Nearly 100 students have responded to questionnaires circulated by the HLAA and have asked in particular for a course in Latin American colonial history.

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