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B-School Trims Rugbymen; Fullback Kicking Dominates

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The Harvard Rugby Club last yesterday to the Business School A team, 13-10, in a hard-mitting contest marked by clutch B-School kicking.

In the first 30 minutes neither team dominated play, and at the half the B-School led, 7-4. For most of the second half, Harvard forwards controlled the ball in B-School territory. However, defensive backs kicked the ball back out three times from within their 25-yard line.

"Several times a forward broke loose, but he had no support. It takes time for the other forwards to get out of the scrum and to follow the ball," said forward and scrum lock Tom McKinley. McKinley scored Harvard's lone four-point try in the second half, on a 20-yard run through the B-School's blind side.

Another time, Harvard reached the B-School four-yard line, but could not cash in.

Harvard led first, 3-0, on inside center John Waciuma's 40-yard penalty kick. The B-School rebounded with fly half Allan Hanna scrambling for a try on Harvard's right side. Crimson defenders had been decoyed to the open side by a B-School fullback.

Wacluma split the uprights again in the first half, and McKinley's tally finished off Crimson scoring. Hanna converted a 34-yard penalty kick in the first half. His teammate John Sinnott also ran for a try, and a successful extra kick accounted for the B-School's final score.

"It was a good, open, scrappy game," Hanna said. "The Harvard pack was lighter and nippier than us, but our pack won most of the scrums. Harvard did better in the rucks because their forwards were fitter, faster, and quicker on the ball."

McKinley cited Crimson forwards Adrian D.C. Jew, Bill Jemison, Carl Lapinski and Tom Pegnim as standouts. He also lauded Hanna's play. Harvard's Vernon Adams left the game with a sprained ankle with eight minutes remaining, and two other players broke their noses. "Physically, though, it wasn't as tough as most games," McKinley concluded.

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