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BSA Raises Over $300 To Help Paralyzed Boy

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The Black Students' Association (BSA) raised more than $340 at a fundraising party Sunday night at Dunster House for Darryl Williams, the Jamaica Plain High School student who was shot and paralyzed September 28 at a Charlestown High School football game.

"The party was to raise money and to raise consciousness," Eugene J. Green '80, president of BSA, said yesterday, adding "The standard donation was $1, but some students gave five or ten."

"I expect the amount we raise to be in excess of $500, after other organizations contribute," Green added. The Student Assembly collected $36 at its meeting Sunday night.

All the money raised by BSA and other organizations will be sent to the radio station WILD, which has established a trust fund for Williams.

More than 200 people attended the dance, Green said, adding many people went only to give a donation, not to party.

The dance was a success "because it was an example of all Harvard students coming together," Brian L. Dunmoor '80, a member of BSA, said, adding "The biggest thing I enjoyed about the party was the multi-racial emphasis--quite a few whites attended the party."

"I think the people who were there last night were serious about wanting to help," Green said. "Unfortunately the average Harvard student is not familiar with the atmosphere of race relations in Boston."

"Black students in the Boston area are definitely tired of reading in the newspapers about incidents of racial violence that have become part of this area," Green said.

Dunmoor said violent acts in Cambridge against black students by non-Harvard whites have increased since he entered the University.

The BSA will try to educate students on the racial violence around the campus, Green said.

"I want to encourage Harvard students and administrators to write letters to the mayor's office and community leaders and demand that they work upon racial relations in Boston," Green said.

Mayor White said Friday he will meet with a group of students on Tuesday or Wednesday to discuss the issue.

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