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Dead Visit Okayed in Referendum

By David S. Hilzenrath

An overwhelming majority of students approved a resolution that the Undergraduate Council should sponsor a Grateful Dead concert at Harvard this spring, Council officials reported last night.

Seventy-one percent of the students who voted in a non-binding campus-wide referendum this week favored the proposed concert. Fifty-one percent of undergraduates voted on the question.

The fate of the concert now depends on Dean of Students Archie C. Epps III, who said last night that he would announce his decision today. "As a matter of courtesy, I wanted to wait to see the [referendum] results," he explained.

But Epps added that he was "not very optimistic" that the event would take place.

Administration voiced concerns about the kind of crowd the concert may attract, as well as its impact on the Allston community and possible damage to the $50,000 stadium turf.

Give and Take

The Undergraduate Council has been debating the possibility of a Grateful Dead performance since Dudley House representative David Vendler '84 first presented a proposal to the Council's Social Committee in early November.

Sensing strongly divided undergraduate opinion, the Council decided to poll the student body to find out "if this is the kind of social activity that we should be sponsoring," said Brian R. Melendez '86, the government's vice-chair.

Vendler overcame initial financial obstacles by arranging for James Adler, a Brookline car importer, to foot the band's $100,000 bill and $80,000 for other expenses.

From the council's perspective, the event is not intended as a money-making activity, Vendler said. Although the proposed concert could gross more than $400,000 in ticket sales, he added, less than $6000 would remain after Adler and the band collected their shares of the receipts.

But because Council by-laws prohibit the body from charging admission to events for profit, that money would be donated to a charity or scholarship fund, Vendler said.

If Epps grants his approval, the Dead will rock Harvard on April 28. "It's the day after classes end, and everyone will go for a good sort of celebratory event." Vendler commented.

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