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Students Support Kosher Toaster

Few Back Tutor's Objection to Dining Service Funding

By Marion B. Gammill, Crimson Staff Writer

A Dunster House tutor's objection to the University's decision to provide a toaster oven for kosher use only has met with little support among Dunster residents.

"I think in general the reaction is that they are in support of the toaster oven and don't understand the objections Karel F. Liem. Liem said he has spoke with several students about History and Literature tutor Noel Ignatiev's letter.

Some students interviewed in the Dunster dining hall yesterday said they were indignant about Ignatiev's protest.

"Harvard has been really obnoxious with funding to Hillel this semester and the only way [Jewish students] can get a kosher lunch is at Dunster," said Timothy M. Hall '94.

"There is another toaster. I don't see what business a non-resident tutor has telling Dunster [what to do]," he said.

"I don't see the problem with the University providing funds to provide an oven just for kosher food," said Emily C. McNeal '93 said.

McNeal said that she felt the letter "showed [the] tutor's insensitivity."

Peter B. Rutledge '92, who eats with Ignatiev frequently, disagreed. He said the tutor was concerned that the University had funded an object for religious purposes.

"I think that Noel Ignatiev is one of the more sensitive members of the Dunster community and the students who would accuse him of being otherwise simply don't know Noel," Rutledge said.

Adam K. Goodheart '92, who has known Ignative for two years, said although he has no problem with the toaster oven, he understood Ignatiev's position.

"I think it's fine to have a kosher toaster oven there. However, I can definitely understand Noel's concerns about the University funding religious practices," he said.

Goodheart described Ignatiev as being "a verydedicated, very committed tutor. He's verypolitically passionate--it's one of his strengthsas a tutor and as a person."

"I really don't understand what all the fuss isabout. I wonder whether Noel isn't being baitedbecause of his outspoken leftist politics," headded.

However, many Dunster residents said theybelieve kosher students are entitled toappropriate food.

House tutor Cynthia M. Palmer said, "I thinkthe University is responding to legitimate needsof a certain sector of the student body."

Several residents argued that the Universityshould do more to help students with specialdietary needs.

Elbert S. Huang '92 said he felt that"[Harvard] should do more. The amount of food Ican see now doesn't look that great...the varietylooks pretty limited."

However, junior fellow Stephen D. Hsu, wholives in Dunster, wondered how far the policywould go. "I think they've set a precedent," hesaid.

He said, however, he was unsure if thisincident would generate a demand for similarconsiderations from other students.

But many residents interviewed said theydidn't see what the fuss was about.

Jessica B. Ludwig '92-'93 said, "If they'regoing to make a big deal about paying forsomething religious, why don't they get rid of theChristmas tree and the menorah [in Dunster]?"

"The toaster oven is something much morepractical," she said

Goodheart described Ignatiev as being "a verydedicated, very committed tutor. He's verypolitically passionate--it's one of his strengthsas a tutor and as a person."

"I really don't understand what all the fuss isabout. I wonder whether Noel isn't being baitedbecause of his outspoken leftist politics," headded.

However, many Dunster residents said theybelieve kosher students are entitled toappropriate food.

House tutor Cynthia M. Palmer said, "I thinkthe University is responding to legitimate needsof a certain sector of the student body."

Several residents argued that the Universityshould do more to help students with specialdietary needs.

Elbert S. Huang '92 said he felt that"[Harvard] should do more. The amount of food Ican see now doesn't look that great...the varietylooks pretty limited."

However, junior fellow Stephen D. Hsu, wholives in Dunster, wondered how far the policywould go. "I think they've set a precedent," hesaid.

He said, however, he was unsure if thisincident would generate a demand for similarconsiderations from other students.

But many residents interviewed said theydidn't see what the fuss was about.

Jessica B. Ludwig '92-'93 said, "If they'regoing to make a big deal about paying forsomething religious, why don't they get rid of theChristmas tree and the menorah [in Dunster]?"

"The toaster oven is something much morepractical," she said

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