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McKay Runs For Office

Winthrop Senior a Candidate For Iowa State Representative

By Christopher R. Mcfadden

Marc D. McKay '94, a former Undergraduate Council member and Winthrop House affiliate, recently announced his candidacy for Iowa State Representative in the 61st District.

Mckay, 22, has been actively campaigning for the past three weeks. As part of his first mailing campaign, he sent fliers to about 1,500 voters yesterday. He has also made two trips to his district in Ames, Iowa, and plans another trip Friday to address a county convention.

McKay's first challenge will be the June 7 primary, in which he faces opponent Cele Burnett. The winner of the contest will then oppose Republican John Parks, an Ames city councilor, in November. The district's seat is currently vacant.

"I worked in the state capitol a few years ago," Mckay said. "I saw the politicians working there and said to myself 'I can do as well as they can."

McKay's political experience includes working for local Iowa Democratic campaigns, being a delegate to the state Democratic Convention and serving on the Undergraduate Council at Harvard.

Two years ago, as a Kirkland House representative, he served on the council's finance committee and then resigned. As a junior, he was re-elected and served the full year. After transferring to Winthrop House this fall, McKay was elected for a third term but quit in the fall after an unsuccessful bid for the council president.

McKay said he will stress the differencesbetween himself and his opponent, Cele Burnett,on education and abortion rights issues.

"Burnett says she supports education, but shealso wants to increase funding for environmentalissues," Mckay said. "You can't give money to bothwithout raising taxes."

"Education is the issue," McKay said inthe campaign mailing to district voters today.

McKay also cited differences in their stanceson abortion rights. He opposes waiting periods andparental notification acts, both of which he saidhis opponent endorses.

To emphasize his support for women's rights,Mckay printed campaign buttons which read: "I amprochoice, pro-woman, pro-McKay."

He said he is concerned that voters "mightassume that Burnett is more in touch with women'sissues because she is a woman herself."

But Burnett countered McKay's charge in aninterview yesterday and said, "I would seriouslyquestion that he would be more liberal on women'sissues than I am."

Burnett said she is a member of the nationalAbortion Rights Action League and a pastcontributor to Planned Parenthood.

She downplayed the importance of the abortionissue in the campaign, but said she would stressthe importance of experience.

"Life experience, common experience," Burnettsaid. "We need someone who knows this district inand out."'

"As a 20-plus year resident, I think I have agood feel about what concerns the voters.Experience adds to my ability to make decisionsbased upon present and past information," shesaid.

McKay conceded that his age may be a negativefactor, but his campaign staff said his youthcould be an advantage.

"This is a college town," Thomas Blair, thecampaign manager, said of Ames, the home of IowaState University. "[Mark] can inspire the youngpeople to get involved in the Democratic Party."

But according to Burnett, McKay might not evenget his name on the ballot because, she alleged,he is not a resident of the district.

"Check the school records," she said. "Hisparents don't live in this district."

Burnett said she may challenge Mckay'spetitions in court.

But Donald McKay, Mark's father, confirmedyesterday that Mark does reside in the district.

"He rents a room on a house at 1413 SummitAvenue," said the senior McKay. "He's lived therefor about two months."

Repeated phone calls to the residence's ownerwere not returned

McKay said he will stress the differencesbetween himself and his opponent, Cele Burnett,on education and abortion rights issues.

"Burnett says she supports education, but shealso wants to increase funding for environmentalissues," Mckay said. "You can't give money to bothwithout raising taxes."

"Education is the issue," McKay said inthe campaign mailing to district voters today.

McKay also cited differences in their stanceson abortion rights. He opposes waiting periods andparental notification acts, both of which he saidhis opponent endorses.

To emphasize his support for women's rights,Mckay printed campaign buttons which read: "I amprochoice, pro-woman, pro-McKay."

He said he is concerned that voters "mightassume that Burnett is more in touch with women'sissues because she is a woman herself."

But Burnett countered McKay's charge in aninterview yesterday and said, "I would seriouslyquestion that he would be more liberal on women'sissues than I am."

Burnett said she is a member of the nationalAbortion Rights Action League and a pastcontributor to Planned Parenthood.

She downplayed the importance of the abortionissue in the campaign, but said she would stressthe importance of experience.

"Life experience, common experience," Burnettsaid. "We need someone who knows this district inand out."'

"As a 20-plus year resident, I think I have agood feel about what concerns the voters.Experience adds to my ability to make decisionsbased upon present and past information," shesaid.

McKay conceded that his age may be a negativefactor, but his campaign staff said his youthcould be an advantage.

"This is a college town," Thomas Blair, thecampaign manager, said of Ames, the home of IowaState University. "[Mark] can inspire the youngpeople to get involved in the Democratic Party."

But according to Burnett, McKay might not evenget his name on the ballot because, she alleged,he is not a resident of the district.

"Check the school records," she said. "Hisparents don't live in this district."

Burnett said she may challenge Mckay'spetitions in court.

But Donald McKay, Mark's father, confirmedyesterday that Mark does reside in the district.

"He rents a room on a house at 1413 SummitAvenue," said the senior McKay. "He's lived therefor about two months."

Repeated phone calls to the residence's ownerwere not returned

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