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FAS Campaign Fund Exceeds $310 Million

Officials Credit Rise in Alumni Giving

By Todd F. Braunstein

The Faculty of Arts and Sciences (FAS) is more than a third of the way towards its $965 million goal in the University's $2.1 billion capital campaign, officials announced earlier this month.

The year-end total of $3 0 million reflects a record $56 million contribution from the Harvard College Fund, surpassing the alumni fund's $50 million goal for 1993-94.

That sum represents a gain of more than $55 million since the University campaign was officially launched on May 13.

The College Fund reflects an alumni participation rate of 52.9 percent, another record for the fund, according to a special edition of The Yard that detailed the fund's year-end report.

Record Year

The college fund's performance in 1993-94 was noteworthy in many ways.

The 25th reunion of the Class of 1969 raised more than $10 million, setting a record for class contributions, according to The Yard.

Eight other reunion classes set records for dollars raised, according to the Yard.

Meanwhile, the Class of 1986 reached an alumni participation rate of 50 percent, representing, the first time a class of recent graduates has achieved such high participation when it wasn't holding a reunion:

Associate Dean of the Faculty for Development Susan K. Feagin, as well as College Fund Chair Paul M. Weissman '52, did not return several phone calls.

Glossy Book

The FAS recently released a colorful 64-page booklet pitching the campaign and its goals to potential donors.

In addition to fun facts and statistics, the booklet features nostalgic quotes from assorted Harvard affiliates, ranging from Henry Adams, Class of 1858, to President Neil L Rudenstine to Digitas co-founder Jefl C. Tarr '96.

The booklet describes, in some detail, what the FAS plans to do with the $965 million it hopes to raise in the five-year capital campaign.

Almost half the money raised, $446 million, is earmarked for investments in Harvard College, according to the book. Of that total, $200 million will be set aside for scholarships, and another $137 million will be reserved for new faculty.

More than anything, the FAS appears to be attempting to tug at graduates' heartstrings.

The manual is dotted with the musings of various Harvard affiliates, either reflecting sentimentally on their Harvard days or asking alums for more money.

"The first time I really saw Harvard was in September, 1960," wrote Rudenstine, who received his Ph.D. from Harvard in 1964. "I arrived...on a brilliant autumn day. I sat more or less motionless for two or three hours...I realized that if I failed to keep a rendezvous with this University, I would always feel as if I had been unwilling to test myself against the very best."

But the pitch from Dean of Admissions and Financial Aid William R. Pitzsimmons '67 had a slightly different tone.

"If we were to back away from our need-based financial aid policy tomorrow, then the next day-not ten years from now, but the next day-we would see a real diminution in the quality of the student body," Pitzsimmons said.

Alumni Gift Guide

In addition to outlining the goals of the program, the new manual describes several "gift opportunities," a millionaire's catalog of possible donations to Harvard College.

For a mere $3.5 million, for example, an alum can "buy" a new Harvard College professorship. And for just $5 million, a graduate can establish a named fund to provide assistance to distinguished teachers.

In an interview on Monday, Dean of the Faculty Jeremy R. Knowles said the prices quoted in the manual are estimates based on the requirements of a specific investment.

The price of a new endowed chair, for example, includes expenditures for salary, fringe benefits, graduate student, office space and so forth, Knowles said.

"I always hope to match institutional needs with donor interests," Knowles said.

Knowles added that he spends about one day of each week fundraising.

Jonathan A. Lewin and Sarah J. Schaffer contributed to the reporting of this story.

The manual is dotted with the musings of various Harvard affiliates, either reflecting sentimentally on their Harvard days or asking alums for more money.

"The first time I really saw Harvard was in September, 1960," wrote Rudenstine, who received his Ph.D. from Harvard in 1964. "I arrived...on a brilliant autumn day. I sat more or less motionless for two or three hours...I realized that if I failed to keep a rendezvous with this University, I would always feel as if I had been unwilling to test myself against the very best."

But the pitch from Dean of Admissions and Financial Aid William R. Pitzsimmons '67 had a slightly different tone.

"If we were to back away from our need-based financial aid policy tomorrow, then the next day-not ten years from now, but the next day-we would see a real diminution in the quality of the student body," Pitzsimmons said.

Alumni Gift Guide

In addition to outlining the goals of the program, the new manual describes several "gift opportunities," a millionaire's catalog of possible donations to Harvard College.

For a mere $3.5 million, for example, an alum can "buy" a new Harvard College professorship. And for just $5 million, a graduate can establish a named fund to provide assistance to distinguished teachers.

In an interview on Monday, Dean of the Faculty Jeremy R. Knowles said the prices quoted in the manual are estimates based on the requirements of a specific investment.

The price of a new endowed chair, for example, includes expenditures for salary, fringe benefits, graduate student, office space and so forth, Knowles said.

"I always hope to match institutional needs with donor interests," Knowles said.

Knowles added that he spends about one day of each week fundraising.

Jonathan A. Lewin and Sarah J. Schaffer contributed to the reporting of this story.

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