News

Amid Boston Overdose Crisis, a Pair of Harvard Students Are Bringing Narcan to the Red Line

News

At First Cambridge City Council Election Forum, Candidates Clash Over Building Emissions

News

Harvard’s Updated Sustainability Plan Garners Optimistic Responses from Student Climate Activists

News

‘Sunroof’ Singer Nicky Youre Lights Up Harvard Yard at Crimson Jam

News

‘The Architect of the Whole Plan’: Harvard Law Graduate Ken Chesebro’s Path to Jan. 6

Gina Grant Graduates From Rindge and Latin

Despite Closed Service, Media Mob School

By Sewell Chan

Gina Grant graduated from the Cambridge Rindge and Latin School yesterday, and may defer entering college for a year, according to her uncle.

The graduation ceremony was heavily guarded, and only students, relatives and friends with tickets were admitted. Although the ceremony was taped and shown on news broadcasts, no reporters were admitted. Outside, School Department spokesperson James R. Ball told reporters to leave the students alone.

"She hasn't made a decision on where's she's going to college," Grant's uncle, Curtis M. Dickson, said in a telephone interview last night.

"She said she might take a year off," Dickson said. "That is an option. She doesn't have to go to college. She can take a year off if she wants to, to let things cool off or to let her have a break."

Dickson is the brother of Dorothy Mayfield, Grant's mother, whom the 19-year-old killed in 1990 in Columbia, S.C. Grant pleaded no contest to involuntary manslaughter and served eight months in juvenile detention before being allowed to move to Massachusetts. She currently lives in North Cambridge.

Grant's early-action acceptance to Harvard was rescinded by a faculty committee on April 3. According to members of the standing committee on admissions and financial aid, her admission was revoked because she had told her interviewer her mother had died in an auto accident.

Dickson said Grant has not yet decided which school to attend, even after deferring admission. Grant has "a variety of schools to choose from," Dickson said.

He said he spoke to his niece several days ago, but did not offer advice on taking a year off, one way or another.

"She may take some time off and that's O.K.," he said. "It's her decision. She's an adult."

Two weeks ago, Grant was one of 11 local students to receive the first ever Estelle Paris Scholarship from the Cambridge Hospital. The students were chosen anonymously based on their academic records and interest in health care careers. Grant's goal is to enter medicine, Dickson said in April.

"The goal was to find Cambridge residents who aspired to health care careers," Linda Chin, the hospital's vicepresident for planning and marketing, told TheCrimson last week.

The scholarship and a $200 award were awardedto each of the 11 applicants at a private ceremonyat Cambridge Rindge and Latin, Chin said.

Grant did not give any remarks at the ceremony,according to Chin.

Chin said Grant was not singled out after itbecame known that she was one of the Estelle Pariswinners. "We haven't spoken to her directly, outof fairness to all people," she said.

The New York Times reported in April that Granthad been accepted to Columbia University. AlthoughBoston University President John Silber said on"Nightline" during the controversy that Grantshould be accepted to Harvard, the school hasdenied accepting Grant.

Grant was also reportedly accepted to TuftsUniversity. in Medford, Mass. Although the schoolrefused to comment on whether Grant had applied orbeen accepted, it stated that Tufts usuallyaccepts students from non-traditional backgroundsand disadvantaged students.

In interviews last week, Dickson and othersclose to Grant in South Carolina said the recentDunster murder-suicide, in which a junior killedher roommate and then herself, serves to vindicateGrant.

"The timing is ironic. The situation at Harvardwas murder, Gina's situation was a self-defensesituation," Dickson said. "Gina would be one ofthe safest students on campus because Gina is nota killer. Gina is in a situation where she had todefend her life."

"Harvard has a hole in [its] intellectualarmor," the uncle added. "They teach psychology atHarvard. Wouldn't they be aware of Gina'ssituation? They rely on newspaper clippingswithout all of the facts. That's ironic."

"It's embarrassing to Harvard because it showsyou cannot predict behavior," said Jack B.Swerling, Grant's defense attorney during hermurder trial in 1990. "There are people among useveryday who are capable of acting out violence.Anyone involved in domestic killings knows thatany violence acted out is solely against theabuser. Those people are not a threat to anyoneelse."

"Harvard was unjustified if they rejected Grantfor fear of future homicidal acts. That homicideoccurred in special circumstances and she is notlikely to kill again," agreed Dr. Harold C.Morgan, a psychiatrist who examined Grant duringher three-month stay at Baptist Medical Centerpreceding her trial.

Curtis R. Chong contributed to the reportingof this story.

The scholarship and a $200 award were awardedto each of the 11 applicants at a private ceremonyat Cambridge Rindge and Latin, Chin said.

Grant did not give any remarks at the ceremony,according to Chin.

Chin said Grant was not singled out after itbecame known that she was one of the Estelle Pariswinners. "We haven't spoken to her directly, outof fairness to all people," she said.

The New York Times reported in April that Granthad been accepted to Columbia University. AlthoughBoston University President John Silber said on"Nightline" during the controversy that Grantshould be accepted to Harvard, the school hasdenied accepting Grant.

Grant was also reportedly accepted to TuftsUniversity. in Medford, Mass. Although the schoolrefused to comment on whether Grant had applied orbeen accepted, it stated that Tufts usuallyaccepts students from non-traditional backgroundsand disadvantaged students.

In interviews last week, Dickson and othersclose to Grant in South Carolina said the recentDunster murder-suicide, in which a junior killedher roommate and then herself, serves to vindicateGrant.

"The timing is ironic. The situation at Harvardwas murder, Gina's situation was a self-defensesituation," Dickson said. "Gina would be one ofthe safest students on campus because Gina is nota killer. Gina is in a situation where she had todefend her life."

"Harvard has a hole in [its] intellectualarmor," the uncle added. "They teach psychology atHarvard. Wouldn't they be aware of Gina'ssituation? They rely on newspaper clippingswithout all of the facts. That's ironic."

"It's embarrassing to Harvard because it showsyou cannot predict behavior," said Jack B.Swerling, Grant's defense attorney during hermurder trial in 1990. "There are people among useveryday who are capable of acting out violence.Anyone involved in domestic killings knows thatany violence acted out is solely against theabuser. Those people are not a threat to anyoneelse."

"Harvard was unjustified if they rejected Grantfor fear of future homicidal acts. That homicideoccurred in special circumstances and she is notlikely to kill again," agreed Dr. Harold C.Morgan, a psychiatrist who examined Grant duringher three-month stay at Baptist Medical Centerpreceding her trial.

Curtis R. Chong contributed to the reportingof this story.

Want to keep up with breaking news? Subscribe to our email newsletter.

Tags