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Mermaid, 'Captain Rudenstine' Attend Seniors' Yard Party

By Todd F. Braunstein

More than 1,200 local seniors who came by bus from rest homes across Cambridge were treated to more than just lunch yesterday in Harvard Yard. They also saw a dancing University president, their mayor in a sailor's cap and even a life-sized mermaid.

President Neil L. Rudenstine, Mayor Kenneth E. Reeves '72 and more than a dozen other city officials and candidates were on hand to greet the seniors at the 20th annual Harvard Yard Picnic.

The event, a goodwill gesture on behalf of the University, is one of the premiere collaborative efforts between a city and school who often find much to disagree about.

The seniors found the day most agreeable. They enjoyed a lunch of chicken and rice, sang along with the Union Orchestra and watched the Roxy Dancers perform classical dances of Indian and South American origin.

Rudenstine, appearing vibrant after a month in Europe, seemed to enjoy himself during his hour at the picnic.

He mingled freely with the senior citizens, stopping to chat at several tables. ("He looks like he's running for city council," joked Councillor Michael A. Sullivan)

In keeping with the spirit of the day's "Ship Ahoy Cambridge" theme, Reeves dubbed Rudenstine the "captain of the good ship Harvard" and presented the president with a sailor's cap.

And in his remarks to the seniors, Rudenstine related a legend about an English gentleman who had no sailing experience but became an admiral in the British navy because he was "always at sea."

"Similarly, the only reason we have this picnic is because we have always been at sea," Rudenstine joked of Harvard.

Rudenstine said he enjoyed the opportunity to meet the Cam- bridge citizens.

"This is one of the days where Harvard andCambridge celebrate the fact that they are ourneighbors and take time to enjoy each other'scompany," he said.

The seniors appeared to have fun as well,despite the heat and humidity.

"I think it's great." said Eileen McGaughey, aretired secretary. "It's a great band, good food,and that's the first time I've ever seen thepresident of Harvard."

Another senior said he enjoyed the picnic as areunion of sorts.

"I get to see people I worked with 30 yearsago," said Charles C. Smith, a retiredsalesperson. "It's very good and very nice."

City officials agreed that the day was asuccess.

Alfred E. Vellucci, the former Cambridge mayorwho was instrumental in establishing the picnic asa Harvard Yard tradition, said the event wasimportant in maintaining good relations with theUniversity.

"If you really want to have a town-gownpicnic," he said "all you have to do is have apicnic and serve the food and you will havefriendship forever.

Reeves hailed the afternoon as a chance for"all of our seniors [to] get to have a wonderfultrip and share food, friendship and fun."

Also attending were more than a dozen othercandidates for this November's city council andschool committee elections. Among them wereincumbent city councillors Kathleen L. Born,Reeves. Sheila T. Russell, Sullivan and Timothy J.Toomey.

Cambridge and Harvard split the cost of theannual event. This year, Harvard's share was morethan $15,000, but officials said the price tag wasworth it.

"The program is designed to foster good will,"said Associate Director of Community RelationsMaryann Jarvis, who organized the event. "It's anopportunity for these people to see their croniesonce a year. It's really kind of infectious."

Rudenstine's Summer

In a brief interview at the picnic yesterday,Rudenstine discussed his month overseas.

In Italy, the president attended the annualmeeting of the Tanner trust, which sponsors theTanner Lectures at Harvard and several otheruniversities.

After that, Rudenstine and his wife, angelicaZ. Rudenstine, took a holiday in England. There,they visited family and friends. the presidentsaid.

Rudenstine returned to office about a week ago.He said yesterday that he will spend the remainderof the summer "getting back into" his lobbyingactivities in Washington, resuming theinterfaculty academic planning process andsearching for a new dean of the Business School.

The president promised a more extensiveinterview later in the summer

"This is one of the days where Harvard andCambridge celebrate the fact that they are ourneighbors and take time to enjoy each other'scompany," he said.

The seniors appeared to have fun as well,despite the heat and humidity.

"I think it's great." said Eileen McGaughey, aretired secretary. "It's a great band, good food,and that's the first time I've ever seen thepresident of Harvard."

Another senior said he enjoyed the picnic as areunion of sorts.

"I get to see people I worked with 30 yearsago," said Charles C. Smith, a retiredsalesperson. "It's very good and very nice."

City officials agreed that the day was asuccess.

Alfred E. Vellucci, the former Cambridge mayorwho was instrumental in establishing the picnic asa Harvard Yard tradition, said the event wasimportant in maintaining good relations with theUniversity.

"If you really want to have a town-gownpicnic," he said "all you have to do is have apicnic and serve the food and you will havefriendship forever.

Reeves hailed the afternoon as a chance for"all of our seniors [to] get to have a wonderfultrip and share food, friendship and fun."

Also attending were more than a dozen othercandidates for this November's city council andschool committee elections. Among them wereincumbent city councillors Kathleen L. Born,Reeves. Sheila T. Russell, Sullivan and Timothy J.Toomey.

Cambridge and Harvard split the cost of theannual event. This year, Harvard's share was morethan $15,000, but officials said the price tag wasworth it.

"The program is designed to foster good will,"said Associate Director of Community RelationsMaryann Jarvis, who organized the event. "It's anopportunity for these people to see their croniesonce a year. It's really kind of infectious."

Rudenstine's Summer

In a brief interview at the picnic yesterday,Rudenstine discussed his month overseas.

In Italy, the president attended the annualmeeting of the Tanner trust, which sponsors theTanner Lectures at Harvard and several otheruniversities.

After that, Rudenstine and his wife, angelicaZ. Rudenstine, took a holiday in England. There,they visited family and friends. the presidentsaid.

Rudenstine returned to office about a week ago.He said yesterday that he will spend the remainderof the summer "getting back into" his lobbyingactivities in Washington, resuming theinterfaculty academic planning process andsearching for a new dean of the Business School.

The president promised a more extensiveinterview later in the summer

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