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IF any man would take the trouble to look over the newly purchased books that are continually pouring in at the Library, he would be surprised either at the apparent present completeness of the Library or else the poor taste shown in the selection of the books recently added. Probably the latter phenomenon would engage his attention; for although in a large university like this books of every description are sure to suit the tastes and needs of at least a few men, yet were he to inquire for some of the standard books of reference he would find but one copy, which alone has to serve for the constant use of a large number of men. In courses in history and philosophy, especially, there is need of at least two or three copies of certain works. The instructor, when he says to a large division, the majority of whom do not feel like buying a five or ten dollar book for one month's use, that the requisite facts may be found in, for instance, Brodhead's "History of New York," Ferguson's "Handbook of Architecture," or Knight's "History of England," is hardly aware how much sarcasm there is in his words. Meanwhile the Library fund is being expended in trashy French novels or massive tomes of recondite lore, wherein a fruitless effort is made to reconcile science with orthodox religion.

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