Editorials

All the World’s a Stage

The fact that the faculty is creating a new concentration to respond to demand shows an admirable openness to the intellectual desires of students.

Op-Eds

What Title IX Does

We write as alumnae who have witnessed the law school’s failure to serve survivors, and who believe that our professors’ willingness to outrightly reject an improved-but-imperfect policy perpetuates that unacceptable legacy.

78 comments

Editorials

Service Should Not Be Required

Requiring such activities is not the best way to foster in students a love and appreciation for service to their community.

1 comment

Bridge and a Troubled Water

As winter approaches, it is unacceptable that municipal turf wars should endanger Boston’s most vulnerable.

2 comments

Moving Toward Gender Parity

While there is no perfect or easy solution to gender equality in Harvard To achieve the gender-balanced future we would like to see, we must guarantee equality throughout the tenure track—and not just at the start.

Op-Eds

Not Just the R- Word, the F-word, Too

Here at Harvard, however, where so many of us are away from home for the first time, some people are taking far too much advantage of being out from their parents’ watchful eye and prying ear.

2 comments

In Defense of Facebook Official

To all the happily dating people at Harvard: Post it on Facebook.

A Walden of Your Own

Unlike Thoreau, we don’t even have to chop our own wood.

2 comments

Media

Quiz the Quizmaster

Summer in Three Words

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Free Time
Columns

In Search of Lost Time

Photo Man
Ivy League

Beyond The Silver Screen

Larry, In His Element
Scrutiny

Professor Summers

Data Sculpture
Visual Arts

Painting by the Numbers: Data Visualization

Columns

Suck

I’m not saying we have to be friends with everyone we sleep with. But we do have to acknowledge that our sexual partners are individuals with subjectivities, and insecurities, and reasonable vulnerabilities.

8 comments
Columns

In Search of Lost Time

Despite working myself to the brink and dismissing the difficulty of my efforts, when I consider my favorite moments at Harvard thus far, they all occurred in the random, uncommon white space on my calendar.

Op-Eds

America Needs to Get Over Ebola

The paranoia Ebola is causing is probably disrupting daily affairs more than the disease itself.

3 comments
Columns

Secular Stagnation

A sterile term like “secular stagnation” could strike fear only into the heart of an economist. But it could be the malaise that defines the economic prospects of our generation.

Columns

Realizing Race

The film is far from perfect, but it performs the difficult and important job of forcing its viewers to think about those touchy things that might make them angry, or uncomfortable, or confused. And those feelings are certainly a start.

8 comments
Columns

What We Forget About School: School

Op-Eds

Letter to the Editor

Editorials

Underfunded and Underprepared

Editorials

Give B's a Chance

Editorials

The Damage of the Culture Wars

Op-Eds

On Divestment: Debate, Don't Marginalize

The Corporation’s avoidance of debate has allowed it to take absolutist, illogical, and unsubstantiated positions on divestment.

23 comments
Op-Eds

In Defense of Pinker

What the current admissions culture has spawned is a flurry of attempts to join extracurricular activities that look good to admissions officers, instead of allowing people the time to pursue things they’re truly passionate about.

3 comments
Editorials

The Professors' Misplaced Criticisms

The authors of the letter are correct in saying that Harvard University must “stand up for principle.” But the principle it must stand for is justice for the victims of sexual harassment and assault.

10 comments
Editorials

Staying Vigilant in Ferguson

It is heartening to see people join the protests in Missouri under a variety of banners.

4 comments
Op-Eds

The Death Penalty: Justice in Peril

To sentence someone to death is to say that this individual no longer has the right to prove his or her innocence. For such a practice to have democratic legitimacy, the legal system must be able to determine guilt with absolute precision.

69 comments
Op-Eds

America’s Mirror

Columns

Let's Put a Cap on Privilege

Columns

Understanding Faith

Editorials

Upwards and Onwards

Columns

Ignore Congress. Close Gitmo.