Johnston Gate Arts Cover

Rebuilding the Past: Harvard's Beautification Renaissance

New ideologies about aesthetics and an unprecedented appreciation of the past have emerged in tandem with modern technological methods to effectively recreate the grandiosity of the University’s historic look.

4 comments

Music

Keeping The Music Alive

While jazz at Harvard still searches to find its rhythm, the April 12 concert filled the lower level of Sanders and drew exuberant applause. For all the program’s logistical issues, it continues to draw hard-working musicians from the student body.

"Space Project" Showcases Stellar Songwriting

As far as collaborative albums go, “The Space Project” is a fairly disjointed one, but the album revels in this multifaceted soundscape, turning its diffuse style into its greatest strength.

On Campus

Kushner's Classic Resurrected

From April 17 to 19, Sayantan Deb ’14 will direct the first part of Tony Kushner’s play “Millennium Approaches: Angels in America Part 1” at the Adams Pool Theater. Although the play is set during the American AIDS epidemic of the 1980s and has three gay protagonists, Deb and the cast emphasize that “Angels” is not a play about being gay, but is rather a play about universal human relationships.

Song Cycles Done Right in "Songs for a New World"

Song cycles occupy a peculiar position in the arts world. Lacking plot or cohesive characters, they offer an opportunity for experimentation but may also be prone to poorer productions: stellar acting cannot substitute for lackluster vocal talents, poor directing cannot be overshadowed by plot or characters, and the ability to synthesize a common theme among many pieces becomes crucial. Fortunately for Harvard-Radcliffe Dramatic Club’s “Songs for a New World,” which ran April 10 to April 12, most of these obstacles were overcome.

Film

The Heartbreaking History of "The Railway Man"

Colin Firth and Nicole Kidman portray Eric and Patti Lomax in "The Railway Man," the true story of a World War II POW who, years later, finds and confronts his Japanese former captor.

Georgia "In Bloom"

"In Bloom" tells the coming-of-age story of two teens living in post-Soviet Georgia during the 1990s.

Books

'Downs' Reaches Great Heights

The novel itself is unassuming enough: a meek paperback totaling 165 pages, easily lost among a bookshelf of grander volumes. However, the old adage about judgment and covers should be taken seriously here—this little book has a lot to say.

'Eyes' a Real Dog

“With My Dog-Eyes” is not a lost masterpiece; it is a call to action, to reform a critical atmosphere in which failure to communicate is raised to the acme of aesthetic virtue.

1 comment
Youth Homelessness in the Square
Harvard Square

For Homeless Youth, Age Can Compound Challenges of Life on the Streets

On Year Later: Boston Marathon Bombings
Boston Marathon

VIDEO: Looking Back One Year Later, Harvard Affiliates Prepare to Return to Finish Line

Johnston Gate Arts Cover
Arts

Rebuilding the Past: Harvard's Beautification Renaissance

Awkward Eye Contact
Columns

Let’s Talk about Campus-Eye-Contact-Culture

Film

Georgia "In Bloom"

"In Bloom" tells the coming-of-age story of two teens living in post-Soviet Georgia during the 1990s.

Film

'Oculus' Is a Fresh Look at the Horror Movie Genre

“Oculus” portrays the childhood and adult experiences of Kaylie (Karen Gillan) and Tim (Brenton Thwaites) with an antique, sinister mirror called the Lasser Glass.

2 comments
On Campus

Song Cycles Done Right in "Songs for a New World"

Song cycles occupy a peculiar position in the arts world. Lacking plot or cohesive characters, they offer an opportunity for experimentation but may also be prone to poorer productions: stellar acting cannot substitute for lackluster vocal talents, poor directing cannot be overshadowed by plot or characters, and the ability to synthesize a common theme among many pieces becomes crucial. Fortunately for Harvard-Radcliffe Dramatic Club’s “Songs for a New World,” which ran April 10 to April 12, most of these obstacles were overcome.

Film

"Draft Day" Fails to Make the Cut

“Draft Day” offers a somewhat interesting look behind the curtain of the NFL draft and stars Kevin Costner.

Film

Wayans Weighs in on Comedy and Success

The Crimson interviews Marlon Wayans prior to "A Haunted House 2."

Columns

The Tanning of America

Music

"Space Project" Showcases Stellar Songwriting

Music

Hear Me Out: The Roots, "When the People Cheer"

On Campus

“The Shape She Makes” Makes Movement Matter

“The Shape She Makes” will play at the OBERON in Cambridge until April 27. Its complicated narrative and performance structure succeeds because creative directors Jonathan Bernstein and Susan Misner ambitiously create moments of intrigue and emotion within each scene.

Books

'Downs' Reaches Great Heights

The novel itself is unassuming enough: a meek paperback totaling 165 pages, easily lost among a bookshelf of grander volumes. However, the old adage about judgment and covers should be taken seriously here—this little book has a lot to say.

Books

'Eyes' a Real Dog

“With My Dog-Eyes” is not a lost masterpiece; it is a call to action, to reform a critical atmosphere in which failure to communicate is raised to the acme of aesthetic virtue.

1 comment
On Campus

Artist Spotlight: Benjamin Bagby

Composer, harpist, and performer of medieval music, Benjamin Bagby is currently touring the country performing “Beowulf” in its original Old English.

On Campus

Keeping The Music Alive

While jazz at Harvard still searches to find its rhythm, the April 12 concert filled the lower level of Sanders and drew exuberant applause. For all the program’s logistical issues, it continues to draw hard-working musicians from the student body.

On Campus

'Versatorium Playbook' Explores Translation

Arts

Rebuilding the Past: Harvard's Beautification Renaissance

On Campus

Collegium Collaborates on "Boundless Realms of Joy"