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Dead Letter: The Aesthetics of Horror

An investigative essay into the value of artistic representations of gore.

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Music

Medicine Builds a 'Home' Eclectic

Though upon first listen, the nine individual tracks seem incongruous, even occasionally unpleasant, Medicine’s avant-garde approach to production and song structure is unapologetically itself.

Swift Shines Brightest on Latest

Taylor Swift’s transition into a bona fide pop artist has been years in the making, and her metamorphosis is finally complete. “1989” is the result, and it’s arguably Swift’s best record to date.

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On Campus

'Carrie and Otis' Excites with a Refreshing, Witty Take on the 'Odyssey'

The Pool has a small, relaxed feel to it, and "Carrie and Otis" is a small, relaxed kind of play. It doesn’t try to be thematically grand or artistically ground-breaking; instead, it tries to be sweet, pithy, funny, interesting, and generally fun. And it succeeds.

Ferguson Influences Upcoming Adaptation of 'Mother Courage'

An image of armored police officers during the August riots in Ferguson, Missouri, sets the story of the Harvard-Radcliffe Dramatic Club's production of “Mother Courage and Her Children," which runs from Oct. 30 to Nov. 1 at Farkas Hall. The play’s promotional poster gives a small glimpse of the conflict that underlies the plot: smoke-filled darkness is pierced by the flashlight of a police officer’s assault rifle, illuminating the few dozen other officers around him.

Film

'Birdman' Soars

“Birdman” is an exquisite, well-crafted, and inventive masterpiece that is not only another piece of evidence for director Alejandro González Iñárritu’s genius but also very likely to be the best film of the year.

Raw Energy in 'Whiplash'

Despite its imperfections, "Whiplash" is a frenzied exploration of music and perfectionism that showcases rising star Miles Teller's true-life drumming talent.

Books

Gibson Anything but 'Peripheral'

When Flynne Fisher—the protagonist of William Gibson’s new novel “The Peripheral”—agrees to cover for her brother Burton at his new job, she is under the impression that she is simply beta-testing a new video game. The reality is much more complicated.

In 'Betrayers,' Bezmozgis Stays True to Literary Tradition

To read a novel like David Bezmozgis’s “The Betrayers” in this mighty age of American literary mass-production is like getting to nibble on one of those small, precious slabs of black-market chocolate in “1984.” Aha! is the feeling: here is a book that recalls what fiction can do! Its quality is concentrated in every part, not scattered about and diluted.

Hockey
Men's Ice Hockey

Hockey Preview 2014

The Oval
Scrutiny

Seeing Red: Stanford v. Harvard

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Arts

Dead Letter: The Aesthetics of Horror

Election Strategy
Columns

Where Did All The Ideas Go?

Columns

Illinois Forks

This week Sarah reveals the source of her guilt to Rachel.

Columns

From April to Lea

Victoria Lin explores the dark, consumer driven push behind the rise in transgender modeling.

On Campus

'Dogfight' to be Unleashed at the Loeb

“Think about yourself and think about the ideal romantic relationship, the ideal friendships that you have,” director Cole V. Edick ’17 says of “Dogfight.” This production, which will run from Oct. 31 to Nov. 8 at the Loeb Experimental Theater, centers around U.S. Marine Corps officers on the eve of their deployment to Vietnam in 1963, their brother-like bond, and the girls who begin to threaten that close friendship.

On Campus

Cast Brings Life to 'Little Murders'

The Harvard-Radcliffe Dramatic Club’s production of Jules Feiffer’s “Little Murders,” which ran from Oct. 17 to Oct. 25 on the Loeb Mainstage, was this year’s Visiting Director’s Project. Under director Shira Milikowsky, the play met the professional standard one has come to expect from the A.R.T.’s mainstage productions.

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Columns

The Framing of Alex Young

Gigi Kisela takes us inside the Harvard Photography Club with its president, Alex B. Young.

On Campus

Artist Spotlight: Jonathan Biss

Film

The 'Last Year' of Fred Ho '79

Film

Unorigininality of 'Fury' Infuriates

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Film

'The Best of Me' Lacks Substance

Film

'Kill the Messenger' a True-to-Life Portrayal of Journalist Gary Webb

Arts

Neesoning

The Arts Blog looks at actors who have fallen into the curse (gift?) of Liam Neeson: typecasting.

On Campus

New Wallace Stevens Recordings Reveal a Daring but Human Poet

Ultimately, the tapes are part of an ongoing journey towards understanding Stevens; nearly half a century after his death, the poetry community is still in the process of unearthing new truths about his life and work.

Music

Run the Jewels Make a Fuming Return

Run the Jewels’s second album takes the frustrated, heavy-hitting sounds of its predecessor and intensifies them, carrying them through 11 unrelenting songs.

Music

Hear Me Out: Ariel Pink, 'Black Ballerina'

“Black Ballerina” has musical potential when it comes to production, but extraneous elements like hazy verses and creepy spoken interludes alienate the listener.

On Campus

Outside the 'Box' With Chesney Snow

Snow speaks like a guru. He has a gentle, slightly lisping voice, so it’s surprising when he puts mic to mouth and emits powerful, pounding drumbeats: loud, commanding kicks; high, bracing snares; delicate cymbals.

Film

'The Book of Life' Simple Yet Vibrant

On Campus

'23rd Floor' a High-Spirited Comedy

Arts

A Desperate Missive to George Clooney in the Wake of His Marriage

Columns

The Crimm

Columns

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