Data Sculpture

Painting by the Numbers: Data Visualization

Persuasive and engaging, digital visualizations are opening up new frontiers of understanding and sharing information, as well as creating new risks.

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Music

Kele Proves He Is No One-Trick Pony

Kele has produced a carefully balanced mixture of soulful rhythms and electronic beats to complement his profound lyrics on an eclectic but sometimes-inconsistent album.

Hear Me Out: Charli XCX, “London Queen”

With the relentless drumbeat and vocals imbued with tongue-in-cheek rebelliousness, XCX seems to be abandoning her trademark slick, beat-heavy production for a more raw, pseudo-punk vibe.

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On Campus

'Carrie and Otis': A Classic Tale of Girl Eats Boy

What happens when you combine Greek mythology with teen angst and dark humor? You just might end up with “Carrie and Otis,” an original play running at the Adams Pool Theater from Oct. 23 to 26. Written by Mike C. Ross ’16 and directed by Megan G. Jones ’16, “Carrie and Otis” offers a window into the lives of three man-eating Sirens and presents a delightfully timeless interpretation of classic lore.

Vizenor Combines Dream Songs and Haikus

The role and power of the haiku as a form of poetry has been the subject of significant debate since its introduction to the West. On Oct. 16, Native American poet and academic Gerald Vizenor added another voice to the discussion.

Film

Justin Simien: 'Dear White People'

Director Justin Simien discusses his film "Dear White People," which presents a sophisticated reflection on racism and the experience of being black in America.

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'St. Vincent' Unbalanced

Despite its flaws, “St. Vincent” is a fairly enjoyable experience, neither a must-see nor a total waste of time. Bill Murray stars alongside Melissa McCarthy as a hedonistic grouch who begins babysitting the son of his next-door neighbor.

Books

In 'Betrayers,' Bezmozgis Stays True to Literary Tradition

To read a novel like David Bezmozgis’s “The Betrayers” in this mighty age of American literary mass-production is like getting to nibble on one of those small, precious slabs of black-market chocolate in “1984.” Aha! is the feeling: here is a book that recalls what fiction can do! Its quality is concentrated in every part, not scattered about and diluted.

"Dan" Disappointing

Yes, it is worthwhile to read this feisty little novel, which was written by Joanna Ruocco and published by an innovative women’s literature group called Dorothy, A Publishing Project. But the worth may not be in its pleasure so much as its pain.

Media

Quiz the Quizmaster

Summer in Three Words

Free Time
Columns

In Search of Lost Time

Photo Man
Ivy League

Beyond The Silver Screen

Larry, In His Element
Scrutiny

Professor Summers

Data Sculpture
Visual Arts

Painting by the Numbers: Data Visualization

Arts

A Desperate Missive to George Clooney in the Wake of His Marriage

A passionate voice shares her feelings for the recently-married George Clooney.

Columns

The Crimm

Natalia Wojcik discusses all the things you've missed in movies, TV, and more.

Columns

What's the Story

Dylan R. Schaffer discusses the importance of the stories albums tell.

Books

Faber's Most Recent 'Strange,' 'New,' and Underdeveloped

“The Book of Strange New Things” raises fascinating and worthwhile questions, though its answers remain inconclusive or noncommittal.

Visual Arts

A Gala For Goya

Employed as a court painter by four successive Spanish monarchs and beloved for his flattering paintings of aristocrats and intellectuals, Goya was also gifted with a perceptive eye for human nature and the sociopolitical changes of his country, as suggested by his sometimes mordant lithographs, prints, and etchings.

On Campus

'With Fates Driving' Worthy of Triumph

Music

Foxygen Adds to Sonic Palette on ‘Star Power’

Theater

Directed Study: The Visiting Director's Program at the ART

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Film

No Objections to 'The Judge'

On Campus

Sluggish Sections, Solo Standouts at BachSoc Concert

Books

Weird Books: RightWing Bob

The Arts Blog presents a provocative Dylan-themed book from the bottom of the Crimson Arts book box.

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On Campus

'23rd Floor' Guarantees Laughs

There’s a promising show in the works for fans of humor. “Laughter on the 23rd Floor,” produced by the Harvard-Radcliffe Dramatic Club and The Office for the Arts, is a comedy about comedy. Directed by Boyd I.R. Hampton ’16, the play premieres Oct. 17 at the Loeb Experimental Theater.

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On Campus

"Little Murders" Takes Dysfunctional Family to Another Level

A daughter brings home her fiancé to meet her parents, a somewhat ordinary event for most American families. Yet for the Newquist family, no event is ordinary. Harvard-Radcliffe Dramatic Club’s production of “Little Murders,” running from Oct. 17 to Oct. 25, is a dark comedy about a girl, Patsy Newquist, and her dysfunctional family.

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Columns

A Plus-Size Problem

Victoria Lin discusses the problem with "plus-size."

Columns

Rubberneck

As Sarah and Rachel continue through Indiana, Sarah reveals her marital problems while Rachel remembers other drives she's taken.

On Campus

“Tempo” To Resound with Live Music, Reflective Movement

Film

Narratives Converge in 'Eleanor Rigby'

On Campus

Brave and Poignant 'Negative' Leaves a Lasting Impact

On Campus

Artist Spotlight: Chris Thile

On Campus

What’s Gained in Translation: 'With Fates Driving' Reimagines an Epic