BREVITIES.

MR. HEARD has written a song for the Glee Club.

ABOUT 130 men tried the anticipatory examination in Sophomore Prescribed History.

MR. DANFORTH, '77, has been elected President of the H. U. B. C., vice Mr. Sauzade, '78, resigned.

THE latest additions to the Library are henceforth to be posted on a bulletin board in the delivery-room.

THE Senior Class Committee expect that Pach the photographer will be here very shortly. He has been detained to serve on a jury.

THE presence of the letter-box in front of University is not due to the influence of the College Press on the post-office officials, the Advocate to the contrary notwithstanding. A member of '79 suggested to a friend who is connected with the Boston Post-Office the want that the students felt of a letter-box in the Yard. The one now in use is the result.

THE Glee Club needs first and second tenors. Those wishing to try will come to 21 Beck Hall, Wednesdays, at 4 1/2, or Thursdays, at 7.

MR. PAUL TUCKERMAN, '78, has resigned the position of Assistant Secretary of the H. U. B. C., and Mr. R. Trimble, '80, has been elected in his place.

THE Natural History Society are arranging a course of six lectures to begin on the last Thursday in February. Professor Cooke will probably deliver the first one.

AT the next meeting of the Natural History Society, on the first Tuesday in February, there will be an election of officers. All members are requested to be present.

THE base-ball case will be set up to-morrow in the Auditor's office in Memorial. Fifty new balls have been made to replace those that have been lost, at a cost of eight dollars.

THE Senior Class Committee have not as yet found any aspirants for the authorship of the class song. They desire that the words should be handed in to them as soon as possible.

THE Advocate says that "the following stanza (from the Ode at the Supper of the Class of'69), will serve as a model" for the Senior Class Song :

"O, bright and sweet the hour we meet!

Our festal rites be gin!" etc.

It is to be hoped that' 78 will have something better for their "festal rites."

WE learn from the Index that the most common names this year in college are as follows (the number of insertions being given) : -

Brown, 11; Smith, 10; Johnson and Morse, 9; Allen, 8; Hall, 7; Warren, 6; Cushing, Davis, Howe, Parker, Richardson, Sprague, Wheeler, Whiting, 5.

THE surrogate of New York City has been asked to construe the terms of the will of Dr. Martyn Payne, who gave almost all his property to Harvard College, as it is believed to be in contravention to the laws of New York State. The executors are President Eliot, Professor John C. Draper, and the Rev. Dr. Anthon. They are represented by Mr. Granville P. Hawes.

A LARGE gilt cross has been placed above the entrance to the Library. We don't know whether it is meant as an expression of the Faculty's sympathies in the Turco-Russian war, or as an open defiance of the gentleman who lately accused the Library of wasting its substance on "massive tomes of recondite lore, in which a fruitless effort is made to reconcile science and religion."

SOME of the students boarding at Memorial Hall may enjoy the statement in the President's Report, that "the young men who daily use this superb building are for the most part those whose previous lives have been least enriched by familiarity with artificial objects of dignity and beauty, and whose enjoyments are always restricted by an imperative economy."

- Professor Young of Princeton College, Professor Peirce of Harvard, President Porter of Yale, J. E. Hilgard of the United States Coast Survey office, President Garland of Vanderbilt University at Nashville, Tenn., President Barnard of Columbia College, Professor Henry of Smithsonian Institute, and other scientific scholars have signed a memorial to Congress asking that the naval observatory at Washington be removed to a healthier and better situation than it has now, and that, so far as possible, it be made fireproof. - Transcript.

Order of events at the winter meetings of the H. A. A. : -

First Meeting, Saturday, March 9, 1878 (2 P. M.).

1. Vaulting with one hand. 2. Light-weight sparring. 3. Light-weight wrestling. 4. Indian-club swinging. 5. Middle-weight wrestling.

Second Meeting, Saturday, March 16, 1878 (2 P. M.).

1. Horizontal bar. 2. Fencing. 3. Vaulting with two hands. 4. Heavy-weight sparring. 5. Unfinished bouts; sparring and wrestling of previous meeting.

Third Meeting, Saturday, March 23, 1878 (2 P. M.).

1. Standing high jump. 2. Heavy-weight wrestling. 3. Middle-weight sparring. 4. Unfinished bouts : sparring, wrestling, and fencing of previous meeting.