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ACCORDING to the Independent it has been decided impracticable at Exeter to compel students preparing for college to pursue the entire course of study demanded for admission to Harvard, and therefore Exeter will cease to be a special feeder for this college. Although this statement is strictly true, its conclusion gives the impression that Exeter has made some change in her course which will greatly diminish the number of men she sends to Harvard. This impression is so erroneous as to require some notice. Evidently it is impracticable for Exeter or for any other academy to compel students to fit for Harvard, if they prefer to cut short their preparatory course and enter some other college; and, recognizing this, she has always allowed those who intended to go elsewhere to deviate somewhat from the prescribed course for admission here. At the same time she has always shaped her course with special reference to the requirements of Harvard, and shows no intention of ceasing to do so. She was one of the first academies to change her method of instruction in Latin and Greek so as to fit students for the new method of examination; and thus far the change has proved satisfactory. While Exeter may not be a "special feeder" for Harvard, she certainly does not seem to consider the requirements for admission excessive or impracticable.

IT certainly seems strange that the Freshmen, after challenging Cornell, show so little interest in rowing as to have only some eight men in regular training, while their opponents have eighteen. There is material for a good crew in the class, and it is time that it should be fully brought out. It requires some self-denial to follow out a steady course of training through the winter months, but this is the true secret of success. Let '81 take a proper interest in the matter, and she will send an eight against Cornell which will do her honor.

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