OUR EXCHANGES.

THE Yale Nine, says the Courant, has shown great carelessness in its practice games, and much dissatisfaction is felt at the two serious defeats - 4 to 0 and 7 to 0 - which the nine has lately received; the fielding record has been good, but the nine is weak at the bat. The reviews in this number are mild but judicious, and the Yalensicula column contains fully as many thrilling personalities as usual.

THE editors of the Ariel announce that, in future, they intend to make it "emphatically a students' paper." The resolution is a wise one, for the Ariel, though always well written, would certainly be more exciting if it would devote less space to articles on "classical culture" and other kindred subjects.

THE statement that Mr. Colgate withdrew from the Columbia four in consequence of a dispute is denied by the Spectator, which says that he took this step entirely from private reasons. It adds, with dignity, "we did not think it worth while to notice the rumor while it was going the rounds of the city papers."

THE Tripod has a leading article on the "authority of conscience" which is quite as unintelligible as the leading poem, "What Abideth," one verse of which is: -

"Most of the wisdom of the wise

"Is an arid whirling sand,

Veiling and darkening the skies,

But it lacketh strength to stand."

THE Horae Scholasticae from St. Paul's School is as bright as usual, and is one of the few exchanges which know how to make an article on a solid subject entertaining.

AN unfortunate Californian, named Dorn, seems to furnish great amusement to the OEstrus, which gets off three poor jokes on him in the last number. The least vulgar and most brilliant (?) of these is: "Dorn says he has just found out that he is a D. P., - Dorn Phule."

THE Trinity Tablet, Colby Echo, and eight or ten other exchanges announce among their Harvard items that a Chinese and Japanese! elective is to be established here. We are sorry for their disappointment, but the elective pamphlet does n't mention this much-reported course.