TELEGRAPHIC BREVITIES.

FROM THE BOSTON HERALD.

Mr. John B. Gough is not dangerously ill.

There is a threatened Indian outbreak on the Crow reservation.

Great damage has been done to property and crops in Central Alabama by floods.

The Garfield monument fund at Cleveland amounts to $95,000. $250,000 is wanted.

A new baby elephant has been born to the elephant Queen of Barnum's circus, at Bridgeport, Conn.

M. le Roger has been elected president of the French Senate, vice M. Leon Say, appointed minister of finance.

Sullivan and Ryan are in active training at New Orleans for the coming mill next Tuesday. The former is the favorite.

Mr. Frost was declared elected alderman and Mr. Stebbins chosen chairman of the board of aldermen of Boston yesterday.

Slosson still retains his lead over Vigneaux in the great billiard contest in Paris. Schaeffer has challenged the winner of the match.

The small-pox scourge is still devastating the country, raging with virulence in Cincinnati. It is also prevailing in several New England towns.

The president and manager of the Union Generale have been arrested charged with swindling. More failures are expected on the Paris bourse.

Oscar Wilde received a very chill reception at Hartford last evening, having only a small audience at his lecture and receiving the cold shoulder from society.

There was a railroad collision on the Eastern Railroad at Lynn last evening between a passenger train and freight cars. Some damage was done, but no one was injured.

Tidings of De Long of the Jeannette have been found, and a party of explorers are now on the trail, having found several of his records, which show his party has been suffering great privation.

The motion for a new trial for Guiteau will be filed today, and undoubtedly be denied by Judge Cox, who, it is thought, will then sentence the assassin. It is improbable that the body will be delivered to the Philadelphia Refrigerator Company, as the family object.

The funeral of Rev. Dr. Bellows took place yesterday at New York. A high tribute to the deceased was paid by Rev. Edward Everett Hale. A number of clergymen and prominent citizens were present. The interment is at Walpole, N. H.

THE WEATHER.WASHINGTON, D. C., Feb. 3, 1882, 1 A. M. For New England, fair weather, warm south-west, veering to cold north-west winds, falling, followed by rising barometer.