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One of the old time regulations at Yale directs that "A student shall raise his hat at a distance of ten rods from the president, at eight rods from a professor, and at five rods from a tutor."

"Cremation, Scientifically and Religiously considered," is the title of a recent treatise from the pen of Henry Houston Bonnell. The work contains a concise and well written defence of the system.

A sophomore, on answering a knock at his door, was greatly edified, yesterday, at being asked to subscribe to the freshman crew. The ensuing explanation resulted in the rapid withdrawal of his visitor.

By the telegraphic account of the dinner of the Washington Harvard Club. Senator Hoar, and Representative Long declined to attend, because of the exclusion of Messrs. Greener and Terrell from the club.

Princeton is considering a proposition to found a Dining Association similar to the Memorial. Hall Dining Club. The Princetonian, however, thinks the scheme impracticable, and instances former experiments of the same nature which have proved unsuccessful.

Says the Boston Transcript: "Apropos of the Harvard Latin, how are coming generations to know whether the classic "Jacobus" of the quinquennial catalogue is the equivalent of the Semitic Jacob, pure and unadulterated, or the unadulterated, or the naturalized James?"

Henry George, who was a passenger on the Alaska, and feared at one time that he would never again see any land to divide according to his principle of political economy, says that the "only thing that was any likelihood of running short in was lager beer," which would seem to show that great minds may descend to the consideration of small subjects, even in the midst of great perils.