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Apropos of the freshman jubilation last Saturday night, we wonder if the fact has ever occurred to the Athletic committee that since the committee began its memorable career these noisy demonstrations have been increasing both in intensity and frequency. In 1882 there was one grand celebration in the yard, occasioned by a victory over the Yale nine at New Haven, and the winning of the Mott Haven cup on the same eventful day. But, even on this great occasion, the college exulted without firecrackers and horns; and, furthermore, this was the only celebration of the year. Now, however, a class victory is sufficient to turn the college into an uproar, and often the boom of the firecracker is heard in the yard merely when some individual is festive on his own account. And yet this noisy sort of hilarity is forbidden by the regulations. The connection between these forbidden demonstrations and the Athletic committee, if there is one, (we merely offer the suggestion) lies in the numerous restrictions the committee has laid on the students. This is not saying that these restrictions are unwise. That is another question. It is a fact, however, that a paternal government, whatever its wisdom, always runs the risk of having rebellious subjects. It is a law of nature that every man should prefer to manage his own affairs himself, and if the government does not let him do so, it must look for insubordination.

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