Indian Remains at Winthrop.

During the construction of the Boston, Revere Beach and Lynn and the Winthrop and Shore railroads last spring several Indian skeletons were discovered. The discovery aroused great interest among the antiquarians of this vicinity. The skeletons were found just south of the village of Winthrop, near the corner of Buchanan and Pleasant streets. A few days later a group of seven skeletons were found just south of the village of Winthrop, near the corner of Buchanan and Pleasant streets. A few days later a group of seven skeletons was found near Bartlett Park and several skulls and other parts were found in the same vicinity. One skull was encased in hammered copper with an outer covering of bark, held together by bands of twisted bark.

Several of the specimens were sent to Professor Frederick W. Putnam, curator of the Peabody Museum of Archeology, and during the summer he made observations and formed plans to make a regular search this fall. The work was begun a few days ago and Thursday one skeleton was found, in the back-bone of which an arrow head was imbedded two third of an inch. Friday another was discovered and Saturday six were unearthed, of which five were in one group. The five were apparently a warrior, his squaw and three papooses. Near by there was found a portion of an earthen vessel and a roll of copper. The solitary skeleton was about six feet from the group. Under the skull was a number of beads and wampum strings. The skeletons were not more than twelve or fourteen inches under ground. Nearly all were lying on the right side, with knees drawn up to the chin, and facing the east. The soil in which they lay was of a sandy character and not especially adapted to the preservation of the bodies.

Professor Putnam states that the last recorded burial of Indians in Winthrop took place in 1650, so it is certain that these remains are older than that. It is stated that all the land owned by the railroad in that vicinity will be excavated in the spring under the direction of Professor Putnam.