Communication.

We invite all members of the University to contrubute to this column, but we are not responsible for the sentiments expressed.

To the Editors of the Crimson:

Since Memorial Hall matters are now taking a definite shape, it seems best that all that has been done this spring about the future uses of the hall should be made generlly known to the members of the association and to those interested in the question.

President Eliot, on learning that at the general tables the men averaged almost three to a seat, realized that such a state of affairs ought not to exist. He accordingly asked the directors to consider what they thought the proper uses of the hall for the following winter. A committee was appointed and aftercareful consideration of the matter reported three schemes, as follows:

1. That the distribution of club and general tables should be as now; that at the general tables there should be two men to a seat and at the club tables one, allowing each club to take on two extra men if it desired. This would make a maximum number of 1072.

2. To have club tables throughout, with three, four or five extra men at each table, thus accommodating 913, 968, or 1023 men.

3. A combination of the two, to be the same as 1, except that each club table shall take three, four or five extra men. This would accommodate 1110, 1148, 1186 men.

The directors approved the first plan, they being reluctant that any step should be taken, that would more permanently accommodate as great or a greater number of men.

The Corporation then appointed a committee to confer with the directors. A long discussion was held, from which it was very obvious that the Corporation wished to accommodate more men than at present. The directors were asked to reconsider the question.

Statistics were gathered that showed that at the club tables the average of the greatest number of men present at them at one time was for lunch eight and for dinner nine men. The directors then passed a vote by a bare majority,

That next winter the distribution of club and general tables should be as now, and that at club tables of fourteen there should be three extra men, and of twelve, two extra.

This will accommodate 1100 men. It was the desire of a large portion of the board that the present arrangement of club tables should not be encroached upon; it was as a whole very loth to take any step permanently to interfere with the present arrangement of the club tables. So, though willing to make considerable changes, if known to be temorary, lest this one might be considered to hold indefinitely, it was also voted that the question must be re-opened another year.

F. E. FROTHINGHAM.