HARVARD AND THE OPERA.

In all the large university cities of Europe there is a close connection between the students and the opera. The students obtain tickets at reduced rates, form a large proportion of the audience, and so enjoy unusual educational advantages in that way. Until last year there had been no attempts at this University to bring about close relations be-between the students and the Boston Opera. However, last spring a movement was initiated that resulted in the formation of the Opera Association, the purpose of which is to secure for students admission to the opera at reduced rates. Thus the aim of this new organization is to remove the prime obstacle to close relations between Harvard and the Boston Opera namely, high price of admission. By joining this Association for a slight fee a student may secure tickets for approximately half-price. Thus far a large number of men, nearly a thousand, have joined the Association, but among these there are very few Freshmen. Perhaps this is due to the fact that men of the entering class were not here last spring and so do not realize the real significance of the new organi-