CARLISLE WENT DOWN TO 29 TO 7 DEFEAT BEFORE UNIVERSITY ELEVEN

LINE FAILED TO HOLD

Although they more than doubled the University record in rushing the ball and making first downs, the Indians somehow lacked the final punch that wins, and the result of Saturday's game showed them on the small end of a 29 to 7 score.

"Watchful Waiting."

Two of Harvard's four touchdowns were of the same order as that which won the M. A. C. game a week ago, the direct result of "watchful waiting," but the rest of the score was of the more satisfying sort, for it was rolled up by the crumbling of the Carlisle defense before a powerful attack. That aspect of the game, the vindication of the University's scoring ability, was very encouraging. However, from another point of view, the University's showing was disappointing. The Indians seemed to find holes in the line at will, and it is difficult to see why they scored not more than one touchdown. Until Taylor and Parson were sent in, centre and left tackle proved almost invariably to be open doors to a five or six-yard gain. Wiggin and R. C. Curtis fought hard, but they were too light for their jobs, as each was repeatedly rushed out of position by the Carlisle forwards. Caner's superior weight helped him considerably in his position, but inexperience was in itself a great handicap for him, for a chart of the game shows that his was by no means an invulnerable spot in the crimson line. Bigelow and Parson showed their worth to the team in a very impressive manner, while Taylor, undergoing his first real test at centre, proved to be the star of the line. His spirited play improved the work of the line as a whole, and time and again he stopped the runner on plays wide from his position.

Mahan Made First Score.

The scoring began near the end of the first period. Down near his own goal-line, Captain Calac was rushed in his punting, and lifted a high one which went for only 20 yards. Mahan caught the ball on a dead run and well-aided by his interference, sifted through the Carlisle tacklers and scored. He failed to kick the goal.

The second period added to the figures, for McKinlock and King each made to touchdown. The first was the occasion of an attempted Indian forward pass, when McKinlock took the ball out of Pratt's outstretched arms and ran down the sidelines while his interference bowled over all opposition. The second came after a pretty pass, Mahan to Coolidge, which placed the ball on Carlisle's 9-yard line. King took the ball over on three successive tremendous smashes through the line. Mahan kicked both goals.

Carlisle's Triple Pass.

The third period added three points to the University score on McKinlock's drop-kick, and produced for Carlisle their lone touchdown. This was made after a hard march down the field from the Indians' own 7-yard line, during which the ball was advanced by all the methods known to the game, line-plunging, end runs, fake formations, and forward passing. The tally itself came when the Indians worked a deceptive triple pass which sent Wofford over for 6 points. Calac made it 7 by kicking the goal. The University came back in the fourth period, when Dickinson's fumble of Robinson's punt gave the opportunity. A long pass, Watson to Harte, more than made up for a 15-yard penalty which soon followed, and Horween then scored on two plunges at the line.

The list of penalties for the game is unfortunately large, the ball moving 108 yards by that route alone. The University coaches will undoubtedly take steps to reduce this tendency on the part of the line.

The summary:

HARVARD,  CARLISLE.Coolidge, Harte, l.e.  r.e., PrattR. C. Curtis, Parson, l.t.  r.t., MartelleDadmun, Snow, Duncan, l.g.  r.g., Hawk Eagle, MayWiggin, Taylor, Sagar, c.  c. MorrinCowen, Burr, r.g.  l.g., LassaCaner, Bigelow, r.t.  l.t., WelmasSoucy, Lyman, r.e.  l.e., Lookaround, TibbettsWillcox, Watson, Boles, q.b.  q.b., Dickerson, Flood, H. BrokenMcKinlock, Horne, Nelson, l.h.b.  r.h.b., Crane, R. JohnsonKing, Horween, r.h.b.  l.h.b., F. Broker, WoffordMahan, Rollins, Robinson, f.b.  f.b., Cala