SUFFRAGE

The Federal House of Representatives has passed the Susan B. Anthony Bill, the first step towards the constitutional amendment enfranchising the women of the nation. During the past five years the suffragists have made a gallant fight for political equality. Some aspects of that fight have been condemned. Others have been praised. The net result was the passage by the lower branch of the National Legislature of the desired bill.

Since the United States has pledged itself to make the world safe for democracy, it behooves the nation to assure a democracy at home. War is bringing and will bring equal burdens to the men and to the women of the United States. It is only right, it is only just that the women have a voice in the momentous decisions that will affect them just as much as the men.

The present administration has made innumerable calls upon the women as workers in the factories and the fields, and as conservers of the national food supply. Through the passage of the Susan B. Anthony amendment, the Government has made that call more effective. Of course the women would have rendered patriotic aid during the present crisis, regardless of the fate of their enfranchisement. They always have done their share, they always will. But by declaring itself for suffrage, the administration has removed a feeling of irritation and discontent, and has there-by rendered American women more capable and more willing to perform those duties so essential to the success of our armies abroad. The nation has strengthened itself from within.