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"THE TWAIN SHALL MEET"!

It was hot to be expected that the Intercollegiate Conference held at M. I. T. just before the spring recess, would revolutionize student government all at once; neither did any one believe that the interchange of ideas would bring about immediate radical departures from the present conditions of undergraduate life in the colleges which sent delegates, and, as a matter of fact, nothing like this was the result. The conference, although its effect is not visible, in any tangible form, contributed largely to intersectional and interinstitutional understanding. The student delegates from Illinois and other great state universities had an unprecedented opportunity to meet men fully representative of Harvard, Yale, Princeton, M. I. T., and other seaboard institutions. Men from the cast were afforded a chance to discuss matters of common interest with visitors from the middle-west and south. It was a time for the removal of many misapprehensions; the more so because the meeting was not one of rivalry, as is the case at East-West athletic contests, but one of cooperation.

It may seem that two days of discussion of student problems is hardly worth the great amount of labor and expense involved; in fact, it might be said that the given time hardly affords a full treatment of the stated subjects. Perhaps not, but the impressions of forty-eight hours are of untold value, and are worth more, and have more effect than weeks of argument. One of the wisest actions of the conference was the provision for its next meeting on a similar basis, two years hence.

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