THE WEEK AT HARVARD

This is the third weekly review of Harvard happenings, a department which the Crimson plans to make a permanent Saturday feature. Today's issue is being sent to Harvard clubs throughout the world.

The question of limitation of enrollment as voiced in President Lowell's annual report has caused a great deal of debate throughout the past week. The Bok plan, too, has had its share of discussion and is now the subject of a referendum in the whole University. Close, exciting games have characterized the athletics of the week. The squash team is now in a position where it is certain of the Massachusetts State Championship.

It had been expected that President Lowell's report would deal with the limitation of the enrollment of the college. On Monday the report was read to the Overseers and made public. In it, President Lowell said that the idea of limitation was disagreeable but that some form of it was necessary if the service to the students was not to be reduced. The present equipment and teaching staff could only care for a limited number, he said. The needs of the University concluded his report.

Although President Lowell did not propose any definite plan for limiting Harvard, he did give some of the requirements that such a plan would have to fulfill. The CRIMSON, however, proposed a plan, which the Harvard Debating Union discussed on Tuesday, deciding in favor of a higher scholastic standard, abolition of full entrance exams and inauguration of a general cultural test.

Interest in debating seems to be growing at Harvard, as evidenced by the fact that English 30a has been revised as a half course in debating.

Balloting on the winning Bok Peace Plan throughout the University began on Thursday and will continue until next Wednesday. Already a great number of votes have been cast in the eight polling places. A great many Harvard men had hoped that the winning plan was the work of Professor Manley O. Hudson L. Ho, but investigation by the CRIMSON proved that it was not his.

The hockey team had a hard game on

Monday with the Maple A. A., as the last game before the Princeton contest. The revised line-up, with Beals and Hodder changing positions, gave the forward line the added strength to fight its way to a 1-1 tie,.

The basketball team played Worcester Tech on Wednesday winning 30-26 by a last minute rally. The game from start to finish was one of the closest and most exciting seen in a long time at Hemenway Gymnasium. Captain Gordon and Smith finally put the Crimson ahead at the finish.

The squash team has now practically clinched the Massachusetts championship. By winning four out of five matches last Saturday from the Tennis and Racquet Club and the same number from Lincoln's Inn yesterday, the team put itself well ahead of the other contenders. Captain W. P. Dixon '25 has been conspicuous lately, especially in his match with C. C. Peabody on Saturday in which he defeated the state champion three games to one. Dixon and Debevoise will meet in the finals of the College tournament on Monday.

March 7 was set as the date for the Junior Dance at a meeting of the Dance Committee on Wednesday. The Juniors applied this week for their rooms in the Yard next year; 433 applied, of whom over a hundred are doomed to disappointment in the allotment,, since there are accommodations for only slightly over 300 men.

At the Lampoon elections for the coming year, held on Thursday night, W. W. Scott '25 was elected President.

The Senior Album Committee has been active this week making up a class list. A list of rules for eligibility to a place on this list have been drawn up by F. A. O. Schwarz, Class Secretary and President of the Student Council, in the hope that they will become permanent. The Student Council met Monday night and approved the plans for allotting rooms, recommended insignia for the fall athletic teams, and appointed a committee, headed by K. S. Pfaffmann '24, to manage the coming Freshman elections.

Freshman hockey and basketball have both been successful. On Monday the 1927 sextet had no trouble in trouncing Cambridge Latin 8-0 and Brookline High 7-0 on Wednesday in a fast game. The Freshman basketball team, with E. L. Lightbourn as its captain, beat Tilton in a tight game on Saturday, and M. I. T. Freshmen on Wednesday by a safe margin. A Freshman crew was able to row on the river on Thursday because of the unusually mild weather conditions, and other crews immediately followed its example.

Dramatically the week has been active. The Cercle Francais presented three one-act plays at the Copley Theatre on Wednesday. Yesterday the 47 Workshop presented a repetition of "Heaven Helps Him" at Brattle Hall