HARVARD MEN DISCOVER NEW DINOSAUR TRACKS

SECURE WEEK'S LEAVE TO CARRY ON FURTHER RESEARCH

Tracks of what may prove to be a hitherto undiscovered form of dinosaur have been found by two University students in the Connecticut River Valley, source of many former prehistoric discoveries.

D. H. Leavitt '26 and D. D. Reynolds '27, students in the Department of Geology, found the tracks at Turner Fall, in the Connecticut Valley, near Amherst. They have now secured leave of absence for a week and are carrying on further research work at the base of Sunderland Cliff, also in the Connecticut River Valley near Amherst.

According to Associate Professor K. F. Mather, the discovery of relics of prehistoric times in the Connecticut River Valley is nothing new. Besides the tracks of such ancient animals as the dinosaur, bones have been found that have enabled archeologists to obtain very accurate skeletons of the creatures that trod New England thousands of years ago.

The Yale Museum, Associate Professor Mather told the CRIMSON reporter, has an especially imposing collection of these bones.

P. E. Raymand, Associate Professor and Curator of the Museum of Comparative Goology, had no statement to make except that he thought no definite valuation of the discovery was timely before more effort could be spent on studying the latest relics from antiquity.