CRIMSON PLAYGOER

"The Matinee Girl" is Ordinary Stuff Made Extraordinary by Scrupulous Attention to Every Detail.

"Another of those musical comedies has come to Boston." That is all the interviewer could find to say of "The Matinee Girl", which is now playing at the New Park Theatre were it not for the scrupulous attentions which has been paid to the details of production throughout the show. The plot of the comedy like that of all musical comedy is unimportant. A young habituee of the front row center becomes desperately enamoured of a spotlight hero and decides to ship as cabin boy in the yacht which is to carry him to Havana.

The music for "The Matinee Girl" was written by F. H. Grey, '06 and Mr. Grey himself conducts the orchestra. The result is a sufficiently mellifluous series of tunes which every member of the audience can hum between the acts and on the way out. The man sitting on the reviewer's left devised a running bass accompaniment to the first number within ten minutes of the rising of the curtain.

The costumer is a man of genius as is shown by the masterful way he converts every stage Rebecca into a plausible and highly romantic Carmen. It is unfortunate that the Espana costumes are not kept longer on the stage. The scanty, raspberry colored, roses which cover the ladies of the chorus in the second act might well have been omitted. And why couldn't the stage have been swept before all those beautiful girls sat down and acquired dust halos on their tights?

The gentlemen of the chorus perform a clogging act which is as complicated as the ones put on by the solo dancers in other shows. The time spent in front of the long-suffering audiences of Stamford and Atlantic City while the chorus achieved its perfection was justified by the applause of the Back Bay connoisseurs.