THE CRIME

Night club life enters Cambridge! To the lush strains of the saxophone player Radcliffe twirls in the arms of Central Square, Central Square in the arms of Harvard, and Sargent--well, Sargent is Sargent. Gloria in excelsis--Sahara. Which might, suggest that this column will eventually become a "Tables for Two"-as--

Wadsworth House--Massachusetts Avenue at Rhinitis--No couvert--Heavy atmosphere, but unexcelled for those who like-the bailey-hoo kind of amuscment. Chic Sales does his preacher act reularly.

Cercle Francais--Place Apfel Struffle-- All right if you like the high brow side of life. Decadent Boston and a bit of Third Class travel combine to give that je ne sais quoi of je ne sais quoi.

Deutcher Verein--Gyoseenplatz--Food and more food, if you like that kind. Dancing also--if you like that kind. Brunhilda and Kaiser appear every evening at twelve.

The Tutor Door--Massachusetts Avenue at Holyoke--An old English atmosphere that takes you back--way back. If you can afford it, excellent. If you can't, go anyway. It's always amusing. The very best Harlem has to offer. Black Bottom, hey, hey stuff starts at two o'clock. Come later.

The Union--Quincy Square--Fine for those who like crowds. The orchestra under E. Z. Soup has its moments. Most like New York of them all.

Pegasus' Perel--Mt. Auburn at--well, just keep going. It's one of those places where the Village still lives. Don't take a college girl.

The Ibis Nest--711 Mt. Auburn--The hottest place in town. And funny! Bob Lampoon, Texas Guinan's old side, kick is here with his own serenaders who record for Years and Years. And food! Just try the cellar of the Ibis Nest, it's too good. Arthur, who was formerly with Inc and Inc. is now in charge. All the Princeton men go there.

The Waldow Massachusetts Avenue and Holyoke--Oh! not so good later but excellent for dinner. One of those places where the elite always dine. Good supper music.

The Liberal Club--71, Foity-Foist Street Every morning from 2 until the last alarm clock--Free lunch, free air--and the famous Senorita Gadfly. Worth half the price.

Why do you call me, lady fair,

And ever ask my name?

When you known I'll never tell you,

You ring up just the same.

Perhaps you want a party

A John Held kind of date,

I'm not that kind of a guy, Dear,

That I will freely state.

So why do you call me up, dear,

The; same old army game,

For when I soon hang up, dear,

The pleasure must be lame.

Oh! Why do you ring me up, dear,

When I always turn you down,

Perhaps it's another tradition

Of this delightful town.

I'll bite.

Once upon a time or two a little girl was caling upon her maiden aunt. Said the maiden aunt to the little girl. "My niece, my niece, where have you been all these long years since I saw you last?",

"Walking. Just walking."

"Well", replied the maiden aunt with that stentorian voice associated with such stories. "Do you realize that I am a wolf and will eat you up." And the maiden aunt, who was really a wolf, jumped out of bed and was about to eat up the little girl when the little girl up and spoke.

"Say listen, oldster, you can't eat your little sugar plum right now, see?"

"Why not?" interpolated the wolf adjusting its pince nex.

(To be concluded.)