LOWELL BELLS WILL RING FOR FIRST TIME FEB. 22

Group Does Not Comprise True Carillon, Experts Point Out--Are Not Tuned to Accepted Pitches

February 22, Washington's birthday, will mark the first ringing of the Lowell House bells. The 17 chimes have been hoisted up into the tower, and work has been started on removing the scaffolding.

Constantin Saradjeff, Russian carillon expert, who was called to Cambridge to supervise hanging the bells, has returned to Russia. His place is taken by Superintendent Myrwick.

The Lowell House bells differ from ordinary carillons in that they do not conform to any modern musical scale. Tuned to unaccepted pitches, they cannot, strictly speaking, be called a carillon. Experts describe them as "a group of bells". When such chimes are rung, the deep bass bell is kept constantly pealing while the ringer manipulates levers and pulls ropes to ring the remaining bells. This is the work of Adrianoff, of Astoria, Long Island, an American citizen living in this country for 20 years, who will take up his abode in Cambridge.