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BREAK IT UP

Along with the obsolete language requirements and Ph.D. old fogeyism should be classed the University's policy both scholastic and financial, toward the undergraduates concerning the four course per year requirement. At present the minimum tuition fee is $400, based upon the average four course modicum at $100 a course. Ostensibly the system is fair enough, since 16 courses are normally required for the degree, but in reality it is the cause of much injustice and not a little hardship.

The rigidity of the system does not recognize the fact that many students would find it a great convenience to arrange their schedules, insofar as the number of courses a year is concerned, according to their own peculiar needs. Those majoring in the sciences, for instance, often find it desirable to take five courses one year and three the next, as difficulties increase with promotion. Yet despite the fact that in this case the student averages only the usual four courses a year, he is in reality paying a $100 bonus to the University for the privilege of distributing his time as he sees fit.

A similar improvement might be suggested concerning those exempt from English A-1. Since those not exempt receive instruction gratis, if not gratefully, it seems just that those in the former class should be allowed to elect a fifth course in its place if they so desire. The privilege would probably be little used, yet it would be of material assistance to scholarship and needy men, many of whom are exempt from the English requirement. Neither of these changes should entail any serious upheaval at University Hall, yet putting them into effect might help to smooth the rugged way to knowledge for a considerable number of conscientious men.

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