GRIPPE EPIDEMIC NOT DUE TO TRAINTED FOOD

NO SPECIFIC METHOD KNOWN FOR PREVENTING DISEASE

Gastro-enteritis, called for lack of a better name intestinal grippe, was declared yesterday to have no connection with food served by the College in any of the Dining Halls. Dr. Means last night made public a letter from Dr. Gaylord W. Anderson, Director of the Division of Communicable Diseases of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, in which he called the malady "characteristic of the infections disseminated through the secretions of the upper respiratory tract."

The investigation shows that there have been some 60 cases among students, largely in Kirkland, Winthrop, and Lowell Houses, none of them of serious consequence. In absolving the Dining Halls, Dr. Anderson used as evidence the fact that the cases did not occur in an explosive epidemic, but on the contrary, progressed from one building to another over a period of several days. Apparently there is known no specific action which can be taken to limit or prevent the spread of such recurrences.