INQUIRIES DISCLOSE 144 V-MEN ON ROLL OF HARVARD ALUMNI

Return to the horse and buggy age be darned! Harvard is ready. One hundred and forty-four surviving graduates of the Veterinary School, now 36 years defunct, will spring into the traces. Annually they signify their willingness to do so, writing a small 'v' after their names on the questionnaire sent out by the Alumni Office.

Since its establishment in 1882 the School never had twice as many students as professors. Now the only lingering shadow of its former glory could be found in the Arnold Arboretum, an horticultural institution.

Among the eminent Faculty was Albert G. Richardson, instructor in Meat Inspection. Courses included lectures in normal horseshoeing, milk observation, and just plain horse exterior. Tuition charge was only $150. There were six scholarships of $50. Instruments used and horse meat studied were of the best, though there was a "small charge for breakage of apparatus."