Mail

(Ed. Note--The Crimson does not necessarily endorse opinions expressed in printed communications. No attention will be paid to anonymous letters and only under special conditions, at the request of the writer, will names be withheld. Only letters under 400 words can be printed because of space limitations.)

To the Editor of the Crimson:

Now that there is definite sentiment in favor of reform of existent Freshman electoral institutions, I think the time opportune to present a plan embodying the desirable qualities of student democracy and calculated to eradicate the evils of the present, undemocratic Union Committee without returning to the former haphazard selection of class officers. There can be no quarrel with the assertion that an efficient, democratic organ is essential for the accomplishment of the many diverse problems facing so large a Class. It may be further asserted that this organ should be chosen early in the year directly by and from the student body. . .

In brief, I would favor the following plan:

a) The abolition of the office of class president on the ground that it is unsuitable to the efficient conduct of class affairs by developing too much responsibility upon the shoulders of an already overburdened student.

b) The abolition of the present method of selecting the Freshman Union Committee on the ground that is an undemocratic designation of student officials, and further, it is inadequate in scope to accomplish the many tasks open to such a group.

c) The replacement of the former institutions with a Council of representatives, one from each dormitory entry in the yard, selected by each individual group; representatives for commuting students of a number adequate for their needs (5); this group, presided over by a chairman elected by it, to carry out its operations by means of committees selected from its members.

The advantages of such an organization are: 1) This council, composed of members of the most intimate and earliest-meeting Freshman groups, would foster more immediate contacts and fraternity in each dormitory entry. 2) Such a council would create an organization for interdormitory activity and a means for publicizing Freshman affairs. 3) It would provide the vehicle for the expression of new ideas through direct representation on the governing board of every student unit.

Although obviously involving some inequalities in representation because of varying entry enrollment . . . I propose the establishment of such a Freshman Council as the eloquent organ of a major faction of the Harvard student body . . . Sincerely yours,   Bernard J. McMahon, Jr., '41