POGOISM

The Mail

To the Editors of the CRIMSON:

It is interesting to note that the CRIMSON, which has editorially opposed the "Regatta Weekend" and its accompanying "rah-rahism," should have taken it upon itself to sponsor Pogoism. If we assume that "the social unsolidarity" of which the CRIMSON speaks is at least partially a good thing, then the growth of a movement, over three thousand strong, which sports Pogo buttons and chants "I go Pogo" on public occasions must be considered a dangerous phenomenon. The importance of Pogoism is not merely as another manifestation of the growth of mass "rah-rah"; it is possible that this movement may be dangerous in its politics as well as in its social implications.

The CRIMSON which, with a certain "commercial establishment," now sponsors Pogo, has been noted as a liberal paper. Is it then possible that the liberals, finding themselves without a candidate whom they can wholeheartedly support, have in disillusion turned to Pogoism as a form of institutionalized escape? The comic strip, Pogo, is one of the best in circulation and contains both amusing and valuables satire. Anthony Winner '53   Robert M. Goldwyn '52