THE CRIMSON WEEKLY CALENDAR

CINEMA

CAMBRIDGE

BRATTLE: IKIRU ("To Live."), Akira Kurosawa's masterwork, is really two movies--the same one twice. This beautifully photographed and acted story of the tribulations of a dying civil servant is excellent film-making the first time through; repetition, however, blunts the effect. Undoubtedly the best foreign movie of 1960, nonetheless. Evngs. at 5, 7:30, 9:50.

Starts Sunday: The Motion Picture Academy chose Ingmar Bergman's THE VIRGIN SPRING for its best foreign film award four nights back, and the Academy will doubtless receive the pleased applause of the N.Y. Times, the N.Y. Herald Tribune, Saturday Review, Time, Cue, Newsweek and the N.Y. Daily News, all of which oracles found the movie "one of the year's best." In Point of fact, The Virgin Spring is one of Bergman's least successful films: its is cloyingly medieval, pointlessly sadistic, ambiguously surrealistic. Evngs, at 5:30, 7:30, 9:30. TR 6-4226.

UNIVERSITY: Walt Disney's latest and least objectionable full length cartoon features. The 101 DALMATIONS, continues. The dogs are more than pleasant; less so is the inadequate co-feature, HORSE WITH THE FLYING TALE.

Tuesday only: The final film in this year's opera series, Rossini's BARBER OF SEVILLE. The irrepressible Figaro now sings in English.

Starts Wednesday: A poorly-conceived and ill-starred (Dolores Hart, George Hamilton) little comedy called WHERE THE BOYS ARE offers a woefully misleading picture of Florida's Ft. Lauderdale vacationland. Boys meet girls head on--and the naughty little filly that goes too far (here's Hollywood morality for you) ends up in an auto accident. In the hearts of the others, true chaste love has blossomed, and their reward is a quiet kiss in a coupe. Not worth your while. The second feature is some-what more interesting: an Academy Award winning color documentary on the animals of the jungle, SERENGETI. Daily from 1:30. UN 4-4580.

BOSTON

GARY: At last, LA DOLCE VITA has come to Boston. Perhaps the most exciting film to come from post-war Italy, Doice is an angry and moving indictment of the continent's rotting aristocracy; and it's also a remarkably beautiful film. This is no movie to be missed. LI 2-5040