NAC Convenes, Proposes Disruption at M.I.T. Labs

Harvard's November Action Committee last night considered a "blocking action" at the M.I.T. Instrumentation Laboratories and a possible occupation of the Center for International Affairs.

Meeting for the first time, 80 Harvard and Radeliffe students discussed the nature and goals of N.A.C. and its plans for demonstrations during the first week of November.

Acting as chairman, Dean Shephard '71 described Harvard N.A.C. as one of 30 allied committees in Boston area schools and colleges. He stated N.A.C.'s principles-immediate United States withdrawal from Vietnam and active support for the National Liberation Front-and characterized N.A.C. as "a complete radical organization-the beginning of a Boston and nationwide movement."

'Military Picket'

To express opposition to military research projects at M.I.T., N.A.C. members suggested a "militant picket line" around one of the nine Instrumentation Labs. Shephard said he hoped to recruit enough students "to effectively disrupt M.I.T. all day on the 4th of November."

Rick Brown '71 moved that N.A.C. rally support through a one-day occupation of the CFIA. October 31. After discussion, the meeting rejected Brown's proposal but reserved occupation as "a possible lever for enforcing our demands."

SMC Criticism

An unidentified member of the Student Mobilization Committee accused N.A.C. of "a sectarian political stand and sectarian tactics" and asked N.A.C. members to withdraw their support of the N.L.F. One N.A.C. member answered by saying "We are not just against the war, we are against the general pattern of the ruling of this country."

The meeting began with a Newsreel documentary on North Vietnam Shephard then listed N.A.C. activities for early November: a woman's rally in the Fenway, November 1: picketing at M.I.T., November 4 and a demonstration outside a Boston Selective Service office, November 8.

Participants voted only once during the three-hour meeting in Burr Hall. After rejecting the occupation motion, they referred decisions to seven subcommittees.