Harvard Nips M.I.T. 12-11 In Lacrosse

Cle Landolt scored a goal with 24 seconds left in the final period yesterday to enable the Crimson lacrosse team to salvage a 12-11 victory in poorly-played game at M.I.T.

"I didn't like anything about today's game except that we won," said captain Tom Nicosia last night. "For one thing we're not getting enough hustle, and it's hurting us," he added.

Harvard was plagued yesterday by the late-game letdown which was so common during the Southern tour. The Crimson netted six goals before M.I.T. finally got a shot by goalie Kirby Wilcox in the second period, and was on top. 8-4 at halftime.

Gordy grand opened the scoring after only 21 seconds on an assist from Bruce Regan, who has just recovered from an injury. Two minutes later, midfielder Paul Bloom tossed in the second goal, and after another three minutes, Grand tallied again for a 3-0 Crimson lead.

The Ivy League's leading scorer last year. John Ince, then netted three consecutive goals, and it appeared that Harvard might duplicate last spring's 18-1 shellacking of the Engineers.

M.I.T.'s Ken Schwartz got his team going at 1:41 of the second period with a score. The Engineers' progress was short-lived, however, as Regan and Jim Anderson collected Harvard's seventh and eighth goals.

But within the following seven minutes M.I.T. notched three scores to trail by only 8-4. With relative next ease, the Engineers tallied five of the next seven goals to pull within one of the Crimson, 10-9. Less than a minute later, Regan brought the ball in bounds and passed to Frisbee, who bounced in a goal from 15 yards out.

M.I.T. was definitely dominating play at this point, and at 7:59 of the fourth period, Jack Anderson fired the ball into the top left corner. Exactly six minutes later, Chris Davis scored from 10 yards out on a feed from Carl Brainard to tie the score, 11-11. There was a minute left in the game, and Harvard called a time out.

The Engineers won the center draw and threatened to score. But Crimson All-Ivy defenseman Mike Ananis took the ball from an M.I.T. attackman and passed to teammate Don Gogel. Gogel raced down the left sideline and fed to Landolt, who ran in alone on goal and fired the ball past Weinberg into the top left corner of the net to seal the triumph.

"A major disappointment," Nicosia said, "was the defensive midfield. There was also a lack of communication between the midfield and attack." He noted however, that Ananis played well.