A Chronology of Divestment Activism at Harvard

January 12, 1986: TUTU CALLS FOR DIVESTMENT

Anglican Bishop Desmond M. Tutu calls on Harvard to divest at an appearance sponsored by the South African Solidarity Committee (SASC) and the Institute of Politics.

"And when we get to the other side of this liberation game," the 1984 Nobel Peace Prize-winner says in his speech, "we would like to be able to say, 'You know something, Harvard University was with us."'

Jan. 31: INTERNSHIP PROGRAM ON HOLD

SASC issues a 48-page report criticizing a proposed University program to send Harvard students on internships to South Africa. The activist group urged the program's planners to consult more Black South Africans and to structure the internships so as to benefit the Black majority population there.

The University sends Daniel Steiner '54, vice president and general counsel, to South Africa on a fact-finding mission.

Feb. 8: MAJORITY OF UNDERGRADUATES SUPPORTS DIVESTMENT

An opinion poll conducted by the Undergraduate Council reveals that students: approve of divestment by a 65 percent to 35 percent majority; and that nearly 62 percent want the council to take a more political role.

Feb. 21: BLACK FACULTY PRESSURE HARVARD TO DIVEST

The 280-member Association of Black Faculty and Administrators urges Harvard to divest its stock in companies doing business with South Africa.

March 14: UNIVERSITY MAKES PARTIAL DIVESTITURE

Harvard sells $1.8 million worth of stock in the Echlin Corporation because the Connecticut trucking firm would not furnish the University "with sufficient data to form a judgement on their operations in South Africa. The University still owns $416 million in South Africa-related stocks.

March 21: BOK CANCELS INTERNSHIP PROGRAM

Following criticisms from Bishop Tutu, the Rev. Allan Boesak, and faculty members, President Derek C. Bok cancels his plan to send students to South Africa.

"You have to try a number of things, and sometimes they don't work," Bok said.