Seniors Selected for Class Committee Posts

* Appointees will organize activities and donations, maintain contact

Four seniors, who will hold the positions of secretary, treasurer and senior gift co-chairs for the Class of 1998 were chosen by the class committee last week.

Roy E. Bahat '98 was chosen as senior class treasurer and Manisha Bharti '98 was selected as senior class secretary.

The senior gift co-chairs Steven R. Hill '98 and Alice S. Lee '98 were chosen by the first marshals in conjunction with officials involved with alumni donations.

The Senior Class Committee is responsible for organizing senior activities and donations through the end of the year and maintaining class contact after graduation.

The senior class committee includes the marshals, representatives from each house, the secretary, treasurer and the senior gift co-chairs.

As secretary, Bharti will keep track of class members after they leave Harvard and will help organize class reunions after graduation.

Bharti said she does not find the prospect of serving Harvard for life daunting.

"I'm just really excited to be the person who gets to see where everyone will be," she said. "I'm sure that everyone will be doing exciting things."

Hill and Lee will chair the committee that works to encourage seniors to make donations to the senior gift.

Lee said she hopes to educate students about the importance of donating to Harvard, noting that most of Harvard's endowment is restricted for specific purposes.

"If Harvard wants to do something that will really improve life here, it has to come from outside giving," she said.

Hill said that money from the senior gift goes to "real things that make the Harvard experience better for future generations."

He noted that last year's gift, which totalled almost $40,000, was about equal to two full undergraduate scholarships.

Currently seniors can choose to earmark their gift for financial aid or let the University decide how the donation will be used.

Lee and Hill both said they would like to ensure that students are given an opportunity to voice their concerns about the University when the gift is presented.

"We want to get people into a dialogue, not just make a conduit for money to Harvard," Hill said.