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CRIMSON PLAYGOER

"The Eldest" is Well Acted Portrayal of the Morbid Family Life Which a Freed Husband-Killer Leads

By J. M.

In spite of an ever so slight sententiousness, "Capansacchi" as played by Walter Hampden last night was a thoroughly excellent drama played with intelligence. Browning's "The Ring and the Book" which formed the plot for the production is materially preserved although considerably condensed. The essential idea of truth and the characteristic "live to make the world better" are still the motivating influences of the drama, but the discussion is confined to Canon Caponsacchi and his view of the case.

Mr. Hampden in the title role is a most saintly idealist. He plays his part thoroughly in keeping with the Browning tradition of ever marching breast foreward. He preserved the outward calm of a man who was assured of his ideals, and at the same time he avoided becoming a mere negative, white-faced ascetic. He undoubtedly gave the best performance of the evening.

The weakest point was Pompilia, played by Torrup. Her lachrymose voice and sentimentality became rather wearing before the evening was over. Of course her part with its almost cloying exhibitions of imminent maternity necessitated some of this. But it is hard for one familiar with the modern stage tradition of child bearing to be sympathetic with her.

The remainder of the cast was good and the audience was more than attentive. In face, at the end of the third act they were so carried along by the rush of the play that they forgot to applaud as the curtain came down. Such a tribute is rare in Boston and there is reason to believe that it was deserved.

The remainder of the cast was good and the audience was more than attentive. In face, at the end of the third act they were so carried along by the rush of the play that they forgot to applaud as the curtain came down. Such a tribute is rare in Boston and there is reason to believe that it was deserved.

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