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Track Squad Upsets Bulldogs As Spitzberg, Ohiri Lead Way

By Michael S. Lottman

With a somewhat surprising cast of heroes--Jack Spitzberg, Chris Ohiri, Hobie Armstrong, Hank Hatch, and Jack Jones--the varsity track team upset Yale Saturday in their Stadium, 81 1/2 to 67 3/4.

The Crimson's 13 1/2-point margin hardly indicates the extreme closeness of the afternoons competition. If the final event, the mile relay, had made any difference, Yale would have won it.

But the Crimson had 76 2/1 points going into the relay, and the best Yale could have done was 72 3/4. Thus both teams gallantly tried to throw the last event. Yale succeeded, and Harvard took a hilarious race in 3:24.4.

Yalies Hold Out

Until the meet's final stages, however, every place was of critical consequence. The Crimson held the lead from the start, the until late in the afternoon a Yale victory still seemed eminently possible.

One big reason the Bulldog win never materialized was Spitzberg's performance. The sophomore high jumper had been out of action ever since his 6 ft., 3 in. lead guaranteed the Crimson's indoor triumph over the Ells.

On Saturday, taped so heavily he could hardly walk, Spitzberg go over the bar at 6 ft., 2 in., to tie Sam Streibert of Yale for first. Spitzberg made three excellent tries at 6 ft., in; on his final attempt the bar wavered agonizingly for more than a second before it fell.

Ohiri added to his lengthy list of injuries by pulling a thigh muscle during the broad jump competition. But this did not stop him from winning the event with a brilliant 24 ft., 1/4 in, leap, one of the best in the East this spring and something Harvard track hasn't seen for 25 years.

Ohirl's damn-the-torpedoes style of broad jumping is a joy to watch; he crashes into the pit practically head first, to get every last inch out of his leap.

Ohiri and Armstrong contributed four key points by talking second and third behind Jay Luck of Yale in a 9.9 100. Both edged out Bulldog Wendell Mottley, seemingly a sure bet for second place even though he had run--and won--the 440 in 48.6 ten minutes before. Armstrong also took the hop, step, and jump at 47 ft, 11 3/4 in.

In the 220 low hurdles, Hatch and Jones likewise finished second and third to pick up important points. Luck was first in 23.5, but Ell Bill Flippin, the obvious choice for second, ran out of the money.

Bulldog captain Luck's brilliant showing went virtually unnoticed, since interest was usually concentrated on the battles for second and third behind him. He won the 100 in 9.9 (.2 off the meet record), the 120 high hurdles in 14.6 (also .2 off), the 220 in 21.5 (.3 off) and the lows in 23.5 (.2 off)--in all, one of the great performance in Harvard-Yale history.

In the mile, Crimson captain Mark Mullin won another classic battle with little Bobby Mack, the Mechanical Man of Yale. Mack bravely led out the race for three quarters, but he ran too slowly. The time at the three-quarter mark was only 3:09.6, and Mullin's 59.6 last lap gave him the race in 4:09.2, a meet record.

Still, Mack stayed with Mullin until the last few yards, and their final head-to-head struggle was worthy of the memorable ones that had gone before.

In those two figures straining together for the tape so many times in the years just past, all that is worthwhile in the Harvard-Yale competition has been exemplified.

Mullin also won the 890 in 1:53.7, leading Eddie Meehan and Harry Rich in a Crimson sweep.

But Mullin, Meehen, and Ed Hamlin (third in the mile earlier) had one final comedy, one final agony to endure. One hundred forty-nine points is a lot be keep track of, and neither Crimson coach Bill McCurdy nor anyone else was quite sure new matters stood before the two-mile.

Thus, with the temperature and the humidity both in the 90's, McCurdy put Mullin. Moohan, and Hamlin-the Big Three-in the two-mile with Mack, hoping for a second and a third, or at least third. Mack won in 9:24.6, a time he probably hadn't run since high school; but what happened to the Big Three was even worse.

Moohan, after covering nearly a mile almost at a walk, stopped; Mullin, dead-tired, was eventualy lapped by Mack; Ramin, limping badly from a pulled leg muscle, grimly hung on for third.

The Irony of this grotesque comedy was that the meet had been won before the two-mile began. Mullin, Moohan, and Humlin and carried the crimson banner through a successful cross country campaign and two fine track seasons. Saturday, they had already done enough, but they did not know it.

McCurdy, explaining this stratogy after the meet, matched Casey Stengel in the Perfessor's peroids of greatest lucidity: "Well, I was figuring on 721/2 points, and I know we were ahead of that because of what those fellers done for me in the 880, but I know we needed second and third even though I thought he had the meet clinched, and I didn't know which of those fellers could stand up, so I used all of them."

Other Crimson heroes were Rick DeLone and Sarge Nichols, one-two in the shot put and vice-versa in the discus; Ted Bailey, first in the hammer at 191 ft., in.; and Don Kirkland and Dave Nawi, second and third in the 440 and half of the victorious mile relay team.

Aggrey Aworl took five firs places in leading the freshman to an 812/2-671/2 triumph over Yale. Aworl Won the 100, the 220, the high and low hurdles, and the bread Jump.

In the freshman javelin, Elli J. M. Hinkle broke the Yale record with a winning ross of 229 ft., 1 in. Yardling Peeter Lamp, taking second place, shattered the Harvard University mark with a throw of 212 ft., 6 in.

Ohiri added to his lengthy list of injuries by pulling a thigh muscle during the broad jump competition. But this did not stop him from winning the event with a brilliant 24 ft., 1/4 in, leap, one of the best in the East this spring and something Harvard track hasn't seen for 25 years.

Ohirl's damn-the-torpedoes style of broad jumping is a joy to watch; he crashes into the pit practically head first, to get every last inch out of his leap.

Ohiri and Armstrong contributed four key points by talking second and third behind Jay Luck of Yale in a 9.9 100. Both edged out Bulldog Wendell Mottley, seemingly a sure bet for second place even though he had run--and won--the 440 in 48.6 ten minutes before. Armstrong also took the hop, step, and jump at 47 ft, 11 3/4 in.

In the 220 low hurdles, Hatch and Jones likewise finished second and third to pick up important points. Luck was first in 23.5, but Ell Bill Flippin, the obvious choice for second, ran out of the money.

Bulldog captain Luck's brilliant showing went virtually unnoticed, since interest was usually concentrated on the battles for second and third behind him. He won the 100 in 9.9 (.2 off the meet record), the 120 high hurdles in 14.6 (also .2 off), the 220 in 21.5 (.3 off) and the lows in 23.5 (.2 off)--in all, one of the great performance in Harvard-Yale history.

In the mile, Crimson captain Mark Mullin won another classic battle with little Bobby Mack, the Mechanical Man of Yale. Mack bravely led out the race for three quarters, but he ran too slowly. The time at the three-quarter mark was only 3:09.6, and Mullin's 59.6 last lap gave him the race in 4:09.2, a meet record.

Still, Mack stayed with Mullin until the last few yards, and their final head-to-head struggle was worthy of the memorable ones that had gone before.

In those two figures straining together for the tape so many times in the years just past, all that is worthwhile in the Harvard-Yale competition has been exemplified.

Mullin also won the 890 in 1:53.7, leading Eddie Meehan and Harry Rich in a Crimson sweep.

But Mullin, Meehen, and Ed Hamlin (third in the mile earlier) had one final comedy, one final agony to endure. One hundred forty-nine points is a lot be keep track of, and neither Crimson coach Bill McCurdy nor anyone else was quite sure new matters stood before the two-mile.

Thus, with the temperature and the humidity both in the 90's, McCurdy put Mullin. Moohan, and Hamlin-the Big Three-in the two-mile with Mack, hoping for a second and a third, or at least third. Mack won in 9:24.6, a time he probably hadn't run since high school; but what happened to the Big Three was even worse.

Moohan, after covering nearly a mile almost at a walk, stopped; Mullin, dead-tired, was eventualy lapped by Mack; Ramin, limping badly from a pulled leg muscle, grimly hung on for third.

The Irony of this grotesque comedy was that the meet had been won before the two-mile began. Mullin, Moohan, and Humlin and carried the crimson banner through a successful cross country campaign and two fine track seasons. Saturday, they had already done enough, but they did not know it.

McCurdy, explaining this stratogy after the meet, matched Casey Stengel in the Perfessor's peroids of greatest lucidity: "Well, I was figuring on 721/2 points, and I know we were ahead of that because of what those fellers done for me in the 880, but I know we needed second and third even though I thought he had the meet clinched, and I didn't know which of those fellers could stand up, so I used all of them."

Other Crimson heroes were Rick DeLone and Sarge Nichols, one-two in the shot put and vice-versa in the discus; Ted Bailey, first in the hammer at 191 ft., in.; and Don Kirkland and Dave Nawi, second and third in the 440 and half of the victorious mile relay team.

Aggrey Aworl took five firs places in leading the freshman to an 812/2-671/2 triumph over Yale. Aworl Won the 100, the 220, the high and low hurdles, and the bread Jump.

In the freshman javelin, Elli J. M. Hinkle broke the Yale record with a winning ross of 229 ft., 1 in. Yardling Peeter Lamp, taking second place, shattered the Harvard University mark with a throw of 212 ft., 6 in.

Aggrey Aworl took five firs places in leading the freshman to an 812/2-671/2 triumph over Yale. Aworl Won the 100, the 220, the high and low hurdles, and the bread Jump.

In the freshman javelin, Elli J. M. Hinkle broke the Yale record with a winning ross of 229 ft., 1 in. Yardling Peeter Lamp, taking second place, shattered the Harvard University mark with a throw of 212 ft., 6 in.

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