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'Ec 10' Leads Fall Course Enrollment

Gen Ed 105, 'Chamber Music' in Top 10

By Douglas M. Pravda

The ever-popular Social Analysis 10, "Introduction to Economics," boasted an enrollment of 943 students this term--putting it only 11 short of doubling the enrollment of the next highest class, according to figures released yesterday by the Faculty of Arts and Sciences registrar's office.

With 477 students, the second-ranked class on the list was General Education 105, "The Literature of Social Reflection," taught by Professor of Psychiatry and Medical Humanities Robert Coles '50.

Rounding out the top five were Literature and Arts B-54, "Chamber Music from Mozart to Ravel," with 393 students, Chemistry 5, "Introduction to Principles of Chemistry," with 379 students, and Biological Sciences 2, "Organismic and Evolutionary Biology," with 356 students.

The enrollment for Chamber Music could have been even higher, but a lottery last week forced many interested students to choose an alternate course.

In Chamber Music's first lecture, Robinson Professor of Music Robert D. Levin '68 joked with his audience that he expected the high turnout was the result of a headline reading "Get an 'A' for No Effort" in the Confidential Guide to Courses's class review.

While students wouldn't flock to Chem 5 to get an 'A' for no effort, Chemistry Head Tutor James E. Davis said the course is attractive because it provides basic information to beginning chemistry students.

"I think a lot of people who are on the fence try Chem 10 for a week" before choosing Chem 5, he said.

Historical Studies A-34, "Medicine and Society in America," was sixth on the list with 335 students.

Professor of the History of Science Allan M. Brandt said he thought his course attracted students "with a broad range of interests in medicine and social issues."

"I think the strong enrollment reflects the very significant interests in the problems of disease and how we respond to those who are sick," Brandt said.

Following Brandt's class on the list were Math 21a, "Multivariable Calculus," with 331 students, and Computer Science 50, "Introduction to Com- Most Popular Courses Douglas M. Pravda Crimson Courses with the most students enrolled Fall Semester 1995. Social Analysis 10  943 General Education 105  477 Literature and Arts B-54  393 Chemistry  5  379 Biological Sciences 2  356 Historical Studies A-34  335 Maths 21  331 Computer Science 50  323 Foreign Cultures 46  314 Literature and Arts A-22  303 Source: Office of the Registrar

puter Science I," with 323 students.

Assistant Professor of Computer Science Margo I. Seltzer '83, who teaches Computer Science 50, said she thinks more and more people are signing up for the class because "with the network cards in people's rooms now, people are more interested in figuring out just what they can do with computers and making computers more useful to them."

Rounding out the top 10 classes are Foreign Cultures 46, "Caribbean Societies: Socioeconomic Change and Cultural Adaptations," with 314 students, and Literature and Arts A-22, "Poems, Poets, Poetry," with 303.

"Some people are interested in a course with what seems like light reading," said Porter University Professor Helen H. Vendler, who teaches Literature and Arts A-22.

But Vendler cautioned her class is anything but.

"A poem looks short on the page, but it bears much weight because it is the most concise and compressed use of language," Vendler said. "To know a great poem well means to have read it many times and to have thought about it for a long time."

Students interviewed yesterday said they were not concerned about their course sizes.

"Even though Harvard has the stereotype of not concentrating on undergrads, I think that I'll still get good lectures and learn from my Bio Sci 2 class," said Nicole A. Dawson '97. "I'm not intimidated by the size."

Sarah J. Schaffer contributed to this report.

puter Science I," with 323 students.

Assistant Professor of Computer Science Margo I. Seltzer '83, who teaches Computer Science 50, said she thinks more and more people are signing up for the class because "with the network cards in people's rooms now, people are more interested in figuring out just what they can do with computers and making computers more useful to them."

Rounding out the top 10 classes are Foreign Cultures 46, "Caribbean Societies: Socioeconomic Change and Cultural Adaptations," with 314 students, and Literature and Arts A-22, "Poems, Poets, Poetry," with 303.

"Some people are interested in a course with what seems like light reading," said Porter University Professor Helen H. Vendler, who teaches Literature and Arts A-22.

But Vendler cautioned her class is anything but.

"A poem looks short on the page, but it bears much weight because it is the most concise and compressed use of language," Vendler said. "To know a great poem well means to have read it many times and to have thought about it for a long time."

Students interviewed yesterday said they were not concerned about their course sizes.

"Even though Harvard has the stereotype of not concentrating on undergrads, I think that I'll still get good lectures and learn from my Bio Sci 2 class," said Nicole A. Dawson '97. "I'm not intimidated by the size."

Sarah J. Schaffer contributed to this report.

Assistant Professor of Computer Science Margo I. Seltzer '83, who teaches Computer Science 50, said she thinks more and more people are signing up for the class because "with the network cards in people's rooms now, people are more interested in figuring out just what they can do with computers and making computers more useful to them."

Rounding out the top 10 classes are Foreign Cultures 46, "Caribbean Societies: Socioeconomic Change and Cultural Adaptations," with 314 students, and Literature and Arts A-22, "Poems, Poets, Poetry," with 303.

"Some people are interested in a course with what seems like light reading," said Porter University Professor Helen H. Vendler, who teaches Literature and Arts A-22.

But Vendler cautioned her class is anything but.

"A poem looks short on the page, but it bears much weight because it is the most concise and compressed use of language," Vendler said. "To know a great poem well means to have read it many times and to have thought about it for a long time."

Students interviewed yesterday said they were not concerned about their course sizes.

"Even though Harvard has the stereotype of not concentrating on undergrads, I think that I'll still get good lectures and learn from my Bio Sci 2 class," said Nicole A. Dawson '97. "I'm not intimidated by the size."

Sarah J. Schaffer contributed to this report.

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