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Filmmaker Moore Discusses Labor

By Adam I. Arenson

Standing in front of the lecture table in Science Center B last night in a red plaid shirt, jeans and a baseball cap, filmmaker and political activist Michael Moore talked to about 400 students about topics ranging from his views on the upcoming election to corporate downsizing.

Moore, the creator of the critically-acclaimed and controversial 1989 film "Roger and Me," spoke as part of a national tour for his new book, Downsize This, a New York Times bestseller for three weeks.

Moore was followed throughout the speech by a camera operator filming a documentary about the book tour.

Moore referred to his 47-cities-in-50-days tour as "Bigger than Kiss." Cambridge is stop 39.

The Election

Moore said he has little respect for either presidential candidate this year.

"We are in the sorriest election ever," Moore said. "I call this the evil of two lessers."

"We only have one person running for office this year: Billy-Bob Dolton," he said.

Moore called Hillary Rodham Clinton the only redeeming factor in the election, praising her true feminist leadership as a strength in the White House and calling on male Americans to acknowledge her talents rather than belittle them because she is a woman.

Holding up a flattering picture of Hillary Clinton, Moore expressed dismay at the lack of respect she gets from the media.

"Newsweek and Time conspire to portray her as evil just because she's a strong, independent woman who cares about people," he said.

Corporate Terrorism

Reading from his book, Moore explored the notion of "what is terrorism."

Moore cited statistics revealing that the unemployed are more likely to kill to themselves or their spouses than those with jobs.

"Victims will be just as dead, killed off in the name of greed," he said, comparing the victims of the Oklahoma City bombing to those laid off in the most recent General Motors plant closing.

Moore said he considers such downsizing practices terrorism because many companies, including PayDay, AT&T and General Motors continue to make profits while laying off workers.

Citing a recent law meant to prevent all American businesses from interacting with Libya, Moore quipped, "Who are [workers] more scared of--GM or Mohamar Quaddafi? Where are the real acts of terrorism?"

Moore spoke on a number of other topics, responding to the questions on the O.J. Simpson trials, Ralph Nader and the state of American unions.

A recurring theme in his speech was Moore's candor and earnest need to address the problems of the Amer- ican working class. Students received these comments with frequent applause.

Regarding the status of American unions, Moore spoke of the need for greater involvement and more competent leadership.

Moore encouraged audience members to attend a Harvard Union of Clerical and Technical Workers (HUCTW) rally this afternoon outside Mass. Hall.

Additionally, Moore showed a number of censored clips from his television program "TV Nation," which he said was aimed at raising awareness of corporate and political controversies.

He showed a section on the presidents of defunct savings and loans and where they are now.

Another clip featured a Topeka, Kansas, high school student who was granted community service extra credit for his picketing of the funerals for AIDS victims with signs proclaiming, "God Hates Fags."

Moore was brought to the Harvard campus by Perspective, Harvard's liberal magazine, and HUCTW.

Former Perspective managing editor Ciara C. Torres '97 introduced Moore, whom she identified as one of her personal heroes.

"I realized that Harvard has a lot more pull than most students think," said Torres. "I e-mailed him about coming to speak, and he said sure

Regarding the status of American unions, Moore spoke of the need for greater involvement and more competent leadership.

Moore encouraged audience members to attend a Harvard Union of Clerical and Technical Workers (HUCTW) rally this afternoon outside Mass. Hall.

Additionally, Moore showed a number of censored clips from his television program "TV Nation," which he said was aimed at raising awareness of corporate and political controversies.

He showed a section on the presidents of defunct savings and loans and where they are now.

Another clip featured a Topeka, Kansas, high school student who was granted community service extra credit for his picketing of the funerals for AIDS victims with signs proclaiming, "God Hates Fags."

Moore was brought to the Harvard campus by Perspective, Harvard's liberal magazine, and HUCTW.

Former Perspective managing editor Ciara C. Torres '97 introduced Moore, whom she identified as one of her personal heroes.

"I realized that Harvard has a lot more pull than most students think," said Torres. "I e-mailed him about coming to speak, and he said sure

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